Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "recognition" x
  • Manchester Shakespeare x
Clear All
Steve Sohmer

King reads out a report of the scale of the English victory at Agincourt, Exeter exclaims, ‘’Tis wonderful!’, that is, miraculous (4.8.114). Henry immediately declares, ‘Come, go we in procession to the village: And be it death proclaimed through our host To boast of this or take that praise from God Which is his only’ (115–18). Candlemas celebrates two acts of recognition

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

from the town of Gournay in Haute-Normandie not far from the Carreys’ seat, Lisieux. 28 Ascelin and Hugh de Gournay fought beside William the Conqueror at Hastings in 1066; perhaps some Carreys of Lisieux did, too. Shakespeare’s wink at the Norman Gournay or Gournie is another nod to the Careys. Acts of recognition in King John The Troublesome

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

Twelfth Night , the parties to the mutual act of recognition approach each other with that precursor to and enemy of faith, doubt , before they embrace their resurrection and each other. It is their mutual doubt that lifts the moment above what might otherwise have passed as coincidence. I suggest that on 2 February 1601/02 Shakespeare put before the auditors at the Inns of Court a

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

in Illyria’, English Studies 61 (1980), 318–28. Professor Tobin was perhaps not the first to detect the Malvolio–Harvey connection. ‘In 1962 G. R. Hibbard in his book on Nashe noted the analogy between Harvey and Malvolio without suggesting a satiric identity, and cited Muriel Bradbrook’s recognition of a somewhat similar

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

difficult to distinguish truth from lies. Shakespeare’s attempts to see and present her accurately are foiled by his recognition that nothing she says to him and nothing he says about her can be trusted; the more he tries to report what is ... the more desire befuddles judgment. 15

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Rachel E. Hile

voicing criticisms indirectly. He was no Stubbs, which benefited him when he did disturb the system with his 1591 Complaints volume, because although the authorities “punished” the book by calling it in, the author’s career continued to flourish, and the £50 annuity awarded to Spenser in recognition of the 1590 installment of The Faerie Queene continued to be paid until his death.7 Scholars have found satire, at least episodically, in The Shepheardes Calender, in The Faerie Queene, and in the poems of the Complaints volume, and Spenser’s ideas, shared with many

in Spenserian satire
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

Hermione recognises the ‘unknown’ and ‘unknowable’ as ‘other’ and thus constitutes an ethical choice in the sense recommended by Emmanuel Levinas. 23 Levinas defines ethics as a recognition of the ‘other’ that enables the rejection of ‘sovereign reason’ that ‘knows only itself’; as Knapp points out, the ‘other’ in this sense refers to ‘the other person, designated “other”’ as

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

images and text in recognition of the transgressive status of completion? That this conclusion is available is suggested by Sawday’s comparison between early modern designers of machines and the poets described by Sidney as makers of things that never were in nature. 51 Certainly, the context of early modern machine books encourages a reading of Greene’s play as participating in the strategic deployment

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Affiliation, allusion, allegory
Rachel E. Hile

” (written in skeltonics), suggesting widespread recognition of this figure as a sort of everyman satirist (Griffiths, “‘An ende,’” 717–18). Thus, although by the end of his career, “Colin Clout” functioned for contemporaries as a poetic cognomen for Spenser himself, this is a phenomenon of the 1590s that can obscure our understanding of the Colin of 1579. Spenser himself begins the process of greater self-identification with Colin in 1591 in The Ruines of Time, where he apparently refers to himself as the “Colin Clout” who has not yet commemorated the death of Sidney

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

recognition of painting as the supreme model of mimetic representation. 20 In early modern Europe, circulating alongside the notion of ut pictura poesis were the paragone (‘comparison’) debates, which revolved around the struggle for superiority amongst modes of representation. 21 The paragone were known to English playwrights in this period and shape a number of dramatic treatments of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama