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Rodney Barker

child. 8 A referent is similarly imagined by Jorge Luis Borges in his short story ‘ Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius ’, in which a parallel world of phenomena both natural and social is brought into existence by being described and recorded in an encyclopaedia. 9 It is precisely for this reason that Anthony Appiah has raised queries and objections in the debate over ‘recognition’, arguing that he does not wish to be ‘recognised’ by others as an instance of social categories, since this constrains and distorts, and even more radically shapes and forms, a public identity

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Surveillance and transgender bodies in a post-9/ 11 era of neoliberalism
Christine Quinan

surveillance, including body scanners, identity documents, and facial recognition software. These technologies became all the more commonplace after the events of 9/11, which offered a justification for expanding surveillance practices already in use or under development (Clarkson 2014 : 35). But these sorts of security technologies affect different populations differently. As Alissa Bohling ( 2012 : n.p.) writes, ‘because gender has

in Security/ Mobility
Hannah Arendt’s Jewish writings
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

opponents not as a ‘concrete human being’ but as a kind of ‘ghost’ or ‘phantom’. 55 Arendt saw it as a basic task of critical thought to exorcise these phantoms and foster a changed attitude among both Jews and Arabs: ‘recognition of the existence of the state of Israel on one side and of the existence of an Arab population in Palestine and the Near East on the other’. 56 To make sense of Arendt's critical stance, we need again to make a

in Antisemitism and the left
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

distinction between the various kinds of things that they do. The rejection of the view that if there is a contrast between statements and other actions then only the other actions are real has a long history. Hypocrisy is not just, as La Rochefoucauld put it, the compliment that vice pays to virtue. The aphorism is a recognition that even when you want to do the very opposite of what you promised, you have to frame your betrayal in the language and values to which publicly you are committed. This may not be an iron restraint, but it is a restraint nonetheless, and a

in Cultivating political and public identity
French denaturalisation law on the brink of World War II
Marie Beauchamps

are prosecuted in the name of the nation’s security, highlighting those moments when notions of selfhood and otherness are shaped, mobilised, and transformed. My approach to history is motivated by a genealogical method of research, starting with the recognition that contemporary denaturalisation practices continuously articulate a past that nonetheless remains only partially known to us. Accordingly

in Security/ Mobility
Rodney Barker

5 Reformations, revolutions, continuity, and counter-reformations Why revolutions are so sartorially perilous In Robert Wise's 1962 film Two for the Seesaw , Shirley MacLaine reassures besuited middle-class lawyer Robert Mitchum, arriving at a Greenwich Village flat, ‘Take off your hat, and no one will know you've come to the wrong party.’ 1 The colour of a pair of socks or the style of a shirt in settled times are matters of social recognition or at the worst mundane snobbery. In unsettled times, they can be matters of

in Cultivating political and public identity
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

century; it turned out to have extraordinary mobilising power and to appeal to a wide range of political actors. If the legal recognition of Jews was being accomplished in most countries of Western Europe by the end of the 1870s, though not in the East, this was far less true of social recognition of Jews. The emancipation of Jews became an object of multiple resentments, which found political expression in the conceptualisation of the term ‘antisemitism’ itself

in Antisemitism and the left
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

chose qu’intervention’. 7 In the nineteenth century, the concept of ‘belligerency’ was applicable in internal wars: another state could recognize insurgents as ‘belligerents’ provided the armed conflict met certain criteria, the so-called ‘factual test’ (protracted armed conflict, insurgents administering a large portion of a state’s territory, insurgents headed by a responsible authority and so on). 8 Recognition of belligerency did not imply diplomatic

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Jewish emancipation and the Jewish question
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

. In 1761 Voltaire, whose comment that ‘biblical Jews’ were the ‘most detestable people on the earth’ is regularly quoted by historians of antisemitism, authored a powerful protest against the Inquisition, delivered through the mouth of a fictional Rabbi of Smyrna. The ‘Rabbi’ called for universal recognition of ‘all the children of Adam, whites, reds, blacks, greys’ as fellow human beings and condemned an auto-da-fé in Portugal in which, Voltaire wrote, a

in Antisemitism and the left
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America
Jeremy C.A. Smith

went further by founding an original Marxism with the highest level of recognition of indigeneity of any political ideology. Post-​war modernism: literature, political economy and beyond As Lowy and Duggan argue (1998), Mariátegui is a landmark figure in Marxist engagement with Latin American Romanticism.The thread of Romanticism runs through Latin American modernism as a whole.Writers and philosophers strived 158 158 Debating civilisations for a place in Universal History for Latin America on grounds that are typically Romantic. The theme of authenticity denied

in Debating civilisations