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Surveillance and transgender bodies in a post-9/ 11 era of neoliberalism
Christine Quinan

surveillance, including body scanners, identity documents, and facial recognition software. These technologies became all the more commonplace after the events of 9/11, which offered a justification for expanding surveillance practices already in use or under development (Clarkson 2014 : 35). But these sorts of security technologies affect different populations differently. As Alissa Bohling ( 2012 : n.p.) writes, ‘because gender has

in Security/ Mobility
French denaturalisation law on the brink of World War II
Marie Beauchamps

are prosecuted in the name of the nation’s security, highlighting those moments when notions of selfhood and otherness are shaped, mobilised, and transformed. My approach to history is motivated by a genealogical method of research, starting with the recognition that contemporary denaturalisation practices continuously articulate a past that nonetheless remains only partially known to us. Accordingly

in Security/ Mobility
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

chose qu’intervention’. 7 In the nineteenth century, the concept of ‘belligerency’ was applicable in internal wars: another state could recognize insurgents as ‘belligerents’ provided the armed conflict met certain criteria, the so-called ‘factual test’ (protracted armed conflict, insurgents administering a large portion of a state’s territory, insurgents headed by a responsible authority and so on). 8 Recognition of belligerency did not imply diplomatic

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

society. 8 Charles Alexandrowicz has argued that the shrinking of international society’s scope to ‘Eurocentrism’ was due to the switch from natural law, which was universal, to positivism, with its emphasis on treaty law, sovereignty, international personality and recognition (as constitutive of statehood) confined to the so-called ‘civilized states’ as original members of the ‘family of nations’. 9 This is arguable, for many nineteenth century jurists

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

sense McKinley was perhaps the first modern US President. 52 Main events 1895–96 Martí and Gómez sought US recognition and aid but not military intervention, for fear of domination. As Martí mused, ‘To change masters is not to be free’. 53 The inspiring Martí died in an ambush (19 May 1895) and Cuba declared itself independent (15 July), with Salvador Betancourt as President. The Cuban movement in the US, known as the Cuban Junta, was headed

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Public presence, discourse, and migrants as threat
Giannis Gkolfinopoulos

deployed here lies the recognition of the critical role of discourse in the formation of the very reality it supposedly just reflects (Fairclough 2003 : 203–4; Hall 2001 : 72–3). As Michel Foucault ( 1972 : 49) put it, the field of discourse is a field of ‘practices that systematically form the objects of which they speak’. The notion of representation deployed refers to the general use of signs (words

in Security/ Mobility
A discourse view on the European Community and the abolition of border controls in the second half of the 1980s
Stef Wittendorp

background, the EU is often turned into a benevolent actor. Such was the message by European Commission President José Manuel Barroso and EU President Herman van Rompuy in response to the awarding of the Nobel peace prize to the EU in October 2012: ‘this Prize is the strongest possible recognition of the deep political motives behind our Union: the unique effort by ever more European states to overcome war

in Security/ Mobility
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

international public , 5 (1898), 664–5. 82 A. de Lapradelle, ‘Chronique sur les affaires de Cuba’, Revue de droit publique et de science politique en France et à l’étranger , 1 (1900), 75. 83 A. S. Hershey, ‘Intervention and the Recognition of Cuban Independence’, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science , 11 (1898), 58, 77

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century