Search results

Contested narratives of the independence struggle in postconfl ict Timor-Leste
Henri Myrttinen

narrative has emerged in which the ‘valorisation’ of the resistance takes a central place and is anchored in the constitution. Among the living, this has meant the payment of pensions and compensation to veterans, public recognition, medals, public holidays and ceremonies. For the dead heroes of the Falintil, national monuments have been erected and a central heroes’ cemetery built. The official narratives stress heroism, sacrifice and above all unity, a term that resonates strongly in a society where various fault lines came violently to the fore in 2006 in a crisis that

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos
Iosif Kovras and Simon Robins

of identity and memory to exist while blocking others.’ We argue that common graves and the political lives of migrants even after their death highlight the power of contemporary borders in institutionalising power relations. The sovereign state assigns migrant bodies a status that is inconsistent with full recognition of the personhood of the migrant. We subscribe to the performative model of the border (Salter 2011) and argue that the study of the phenomenon of missing migrants can shed analytical and critical light on the study of contemporary borders. As a non

in Migrating borders and moving times
Embodying the disappeared of the Argentinian dictatorship through law
Sévane Garibian

demands of the families of the victims in the face of such absence are in fact at the origin of the unusual creation of a new human right in Argentina: the right to the truth (derecho a la verdad). Recognition of this new subjective right (protecting the families and relatives of the victims) is mirrored by recognition of the state’s duty to vigorously investigate the very body, present or alive, of the ‘stolen children’ of the dictatorship, in the search for the identity and the fate of them all. The derecho a la verdad thus becomes the key to understanding the

in Human remains and mass violence
Regnar Kristensen

drawn attention to the fact that so-called ‘wars’ on internal enemies (e.g. criminals or terrorists) within nation-states take on characteristics which are different from those of traditional ‘wars’ between nations. They question, in particular, the notion of sovereign bodies by suggesting a shift in ground of our understanding of sovereignty from issues of territory and external recognition by states to issues of internal constitutions of sovereign power within states through the exercise of violence over bodies and populations (Hansen and Stepputat 2005: 2). Drawing

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
A war of extermination, grave looting, and culture wars in the American West
Tony Platt

the genocide of Armenians56 and post-Second World War Yugoslavia’s silence about massacres in Croatia.57 Searching California for public remembrances of its tragic past is as frustrating as searching Lisbon for public recognition of the central role of the slave trade in Portugal’s glorious past. In San Francisco, a large wall text on ‘Treatment of Indians’, prominently displayed in the Mission Dolores museum, interprets the near-demise of Native peoples under Spanish colonialism as a matter of natural inevitability. ‘Unable to solve complex medical, social and

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Corpses and mass violence: an inventory of the unthinkable
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

ethical standpoints. To probe the intellectual framework existing today for the recognition of the object ‘body/corpse’, we invited the political scientist Yehonatan Alsheh to examine the concept of biopower, in chapter 1. This HRMV.indb 4 01/09/2014 17:28:32 Introduction  5 theory – developed by Michel Foucault – has in effect become the most commonly used tool of reference in the social and political sciences when it is necessary to address the relationships of power exerted on bodies and to study the punitive or disciplinary pro­ cedures deployed by states. In

in Human remains and mass violence
Missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

acknowledgement of human rights violations is an important truth commission function, reaffirming – or, as in South Africa’s case, affirming – a rights-bearing citizen, a recognition of which is seen to embody the promise of ‘never again’.14 Although commissioners repeated the ritual of acknowledgement to each victim in every public hearing, the materiality of exhumations and associated images provided a more powerful enactment of this ritual than the symbolic exchange of testimony and words. By returning the physical remains to the care of family, the TRC went beyond

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Towards a sonic ethnography of the Maggio festival in Accettura
Lorenzo Ferrarini and Nicola Scaldaferri

it with the past. As a result of these processes, it is now common to hear festival participants provide interpretations that follow the framework provided by Bronzini. The institutionalisation of Bronzini’s interpretation of the Maggio festival came close to reaching an international stage with the preparation of a candidacy for the UNESCO register of Intangible Heritage in 2007. A possible inclusion in the register, with its attached value of international recognition, is a prospect that is raised time and again in local political discourse. The dossier

in Sonic ethnography
The status of bodies in the aftermath of the Khmer Rouge genocide
Anne Yvonne Guillou

religious institutions, Cambodian villagers and the minority Cham Muslim population (who hold Cambodian nationality), who are today increasingly active. In September 1981, the Khmer Rouges, the Son Sannists (non-­ communist nationalists) and the Sihanoukists created a coalition opposed to the pro-Vietnamese government in Phnom Penh. This coalition was given diplomatic recognition by western countries and the United Nations until the peace accords signed between the four Cambodian factions in 1991. On these memorials and museums, see R. Hughes, Fielding Genocide: Post-1979

in Human remains and mass violence
Olivier Thomas Kramsch

‘Schengen’ refers to the agreement which led to the creation of Europe’s borderless Schengen Area. The treaty was signed on 14 June 1985 between five of the then ten member states of the European Economic Community (EEC) near the town of Schengen in Luxembourg. 2 Further productive allusions to walking can be made. In June every year, hundreds of thousands of tourists flock to the next largest city on the Dutch side of the border, Nijmegen, to take part in a four-day walkathon known as the Vierdaagse. In recognition not only of Nijmegen’s Roman past as a military garrison

in Migrating borders and moving times