Search results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • "refugee crisis" x
  • Manchester University Press Journals x
Clear All
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector

Introduction In October 2016 the New York Review of Books published an article by International Rescue Committee President David Miliband titled ‘The Best Ways to Deal with the Refugee Crisis’. It began with a predictable target. US Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s claims about a ‘tremendous flow’ of Syrian refugees making their way to North America were based in ‘myth, not fact’, Miliband wrote ( Miliband, 2016 ). Not only that: they also openly belittled the difficulties faced by those seeking refuge. Those remarks, of course, were hardly unusual. Quite

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

/jan/12/donald-trump-cut-funding-palestinian-refugees-middle-east-security (accessed 13 January 2018 ). Easton-Calabria , E. and Omata , N. ( 2018 ), ‘ Panacea for the Refugee Crisis? Rethinking the Promotion of “Self-Reliance” for Refugees ’, Third World Quarterly , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2018.1458301 . Enloe , C. ( 1991 ), ‘ “Womenandchildren”: Propaganda Tools of Patriarchy ’, in Bates , G. (ed.), Mobilizing Democracy: Changing the US Role in the Middle East ( Monroe, ME : Common

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

). While NGOs lay claim to a ‘non-governmental’ status, direct action thrived when donor sovereignty was, paradoxically, still able to cast a shadow. Given the refugee crisis, few can today contemplate the wretched state of ‘official’ humanitarianism without some disquiet. Despite what we may wish or demand, however, it is unlikely that significant improvement will occur any time soon. But to then conclude that humanitarianism is dead would be a mistake. While autonomous international direct action lies buried in the rubble of the West’s urbicidal wars

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs