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Mia-Marie Hammarlin

definition bad or inferior. Undoubtedly, more studies on news journalism need to be conducted with respect to its oral, informal methods – not least now, in the midst of the shift of journalism from industrial production to ‘an emotionally charged networked environment’ (Beckett & Deuze 2016 1). In earlier times, informal talk – gossip, among other things – was something that mainly took place through oral meetings face to face, whereas today informal talk is being transformed into a text–talk hybrid on the Internet, which, with its archiving functions, gives this hybrid a

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
The dancer of the future dancing radical hope
Dana Mills

gendered violence –​not only protest the worlds in which they are deemed unequal; in their intervention they dance in a world not yet built. In that world, their bodies are perceived as equal to those who oppress them; through their dance they show that we are all equal as embodied beings and deserve to be treated with respect and dignity. Moments of sic-​sensuous are crucial here, as they not only unravel different forms of meaning through aesthetic and political interventions; they unravel a world in which those meanings will make sense. The dancer of the future

in Dance and politics
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

other things) the so-called rent-allowance scandal – one of the reasons why I interviewed her in particular. The journalists and the rabbits 133 Similar circumstances can be said to apply in respect of Swedish journalism which has been inspired by Britain, not least within public service, where the BBC has been an explicit model. The development toward an idealisation of an objective and politically neutral journalism includes a number of nations and can be traced back in time for almost a hundred years. It began in the 1920s as a backlash against the propaganda

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

between people at opposing ends of the drama after the scandal has died down. They do not encounter one another in reality; but they meet here, in the text, through language. For this reason attention is paid not only to research about media scandals, but also to a number of published texts written by Swedish journalists who deal with the phenomenon critically and with curiosity. Such a reflective text was written by the internationally well-respected Swedish publicist and author Göran Rosenberg (2000). He describes journalists who, like beaters and hounds, hunt

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

feeling that this is ‘their’ newspaper appealing to ‘their’ generation and interest group. The following quote from the Nottingham Herald, a rival city newspaper to the Evening Post, is typical in this respect. ‘Do you remember the old Nottingham picture houses or have fond memories or experiences of a night at the flicks? If so, write to us’. 28 In this example, the newspaper clearly signals the

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography
Paul Henley

observational are not necessarily the same thing. But in all cases, from the most detached to the most embedded forms of observational cinema, I argue that there is much more to these praxes than observation, so much so indeed in the case of Observational Cinema, that one could even consider it a misnomer. But this last is a matter that I shall leave for further discussion until Chapter 10 , where I consider the praxis of Observational Cinema in detail. One respect in which there is more than observation to all these various forms of observational cinema

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

’, the Athenian orator who suffered from a speech impediment as a boy (evoking the ironic comment from his wife that ‘That was in Ancient Greece. Has it worked since?’). Filmed in an overpowering, suffocating, low-angled close-up, again with a distorting wide-angled lens, the therapist is represented from Bertie’s point of view as a threatening figure, whose assaults on Bertie’s self-respect prompt the

in The British monarchy on screen
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs
Andrew Higson

in various ways and takes various forms. Firstly, it can be represented in terms of naked power – the power that the monarch wields, the power to make things happen, to issue demands that are acted upon, to use physical force. A second means by which national and even global authority and respect is achieved in these films is through the strategic creation of an awe-inspiring image by surrounding the monarch

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Sharing anthropology
Paul Henley

all that he chose Griaule to be his teacher, there remained a certain ambiguity in Rouch's attitudes towards his mentor, involving a curious mixture of disdain and respect. Rouch liked to present this as an extrapolation of the traditional joking relationship between the cliff-dwelling Dogon, whom Griaule had studied, and the Songhay and the other peoples of the lowland fluvial plains of the Niger with whom he himself mostly worked. This seems to have proved an effective way of both masking and managing the differences in their political views, not only in relation

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

grateful if you’d pass this on. Sincerely, Anna The sentence ‘there is a lot of interest, one can’t disregard that’ is the public-interest argument that is often used when publishing titillating, but by no means vital, news of this kind – in the present case, moreover, with dubious credibility in respect of the source (Petley 2013:19–43). This type of email seems to have increased the willingness of the club to protect the dad. Leaders, coaches, and chairman stubbornly refused to give out his name. They formed a human shield around the family. When the dad and the mum

in Exposed