Search results

Open Access (free)
Murdo Macdonald

powerful imagery that seems to reflect that culture. What is wrong with stereotypes is not that they exist (indeed they normally correspond to some aspect of reality), but that they are selective and inflexible, that is to say they fail to reflect the plural nature of any culture. A particularly interesting example of stereotyping with respect to Scottish art is the over-use of the painting by Sir Henry Raeburn of Colonel Alastair Macdonell of Glengarry. This is one of the images that has stood in for the wider body of Scottish art for many years. It is an interesting

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
The ‘outside’ in poetry in the 1980s and 1990s
Linden Peach

inadequately given the space available, the variety of work that became available in these decades. It hardly needs pointing out that the poetry scene has changed since the publication of British Poetry Since 1970, in which Blake Morrison stereotyped the published poet as writing from a ‘nostalgic liberal humanism’ with ‘strong respect for “traditional” forms, even strict metre and rhyme’ (Jones and Schmidt 1980: 142). Morrison said as much two years later in the introduction to The Penguin Book of Contemporary British Poetry (1982: 11). But, as Robert Hampson and Peter

in Across the margins
Revolutionary nationalism and women’s representation in Ngugi wa Thiong’o
Elleke Boehmer

as well as women, it should be added).10 His own protestations notwithstanding, he has increasingly sidelined the colourful crowds of A Grain of Wheat (1967) with their songs and ribald badinage in favour of single dominant personalities who stand as points of moral focus in his texts. Significant in this respect is his report ‘Women in cultural work: the fate of Kamiirithu people’s theatre in Kenya’ (1983), in which the ostensible pro-woman stance is rather obviously grafted onto a fairly straightforward factual account of the experience.11 Related inconsistencies

in Stories of women
Louisa Atkinson’s recasting of the Australian landscape
Grace Moore

A botanist, journalist, taxidermist, and fiction-writer, Louisa Atkinson (1834–72) was the first Australian-born woman to publish a novel, and a stern critic of violence in the name of progress. Gertrude the Emigrant (1857) appeared when its author was only twenty-three, but by then Atkinson was already an accomplished nature writer and a highly respected botanical illustrator. 1 She had also begun to pen short stories for the local newspapers, and went on to publish five more novels (an additional novel, Tressa’s Resolve , was published posthumously

in Worlding the south
Applied drama, ‘sympathetic presence’ and person-centred nursing
Matt Jennings, Pat Deeny, and Karl Tizzard-Kleister

The practices and principles of nursing have long been associated with kindness, respect and compassion (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2015 ). Nursing pedagogy promotes these attributes as necessary for humanistic, ‘person-centred’, therapeutic practice. Professors Brendan McCormack and Tanya McCance, in the Person-Centred Nursing Framework (PCNF, see Figure 11.1 ), identify the importance of ‘respecting the patient’s rights as a person, building mutual trust and understanding and developing therapeutic relationships’ ( 2017 : 1). Such values resonate with a

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

An ‘aesthetics of care’ through aural attention
Sylvan Baker and Maggie Inchley

young people and their reflections on it with due respect and care. Crucially, our decision to use verbatim theatre was not to align our practice with that of the therapeutic storytelling that James Thompson, among others, has argued risks recycling a speaker’s trauma ( 2009 : 45). Instead, we wanted to use verbatim theatre techniques and strategies to acknowledge the expertise of the young people and to support an implicit process of self-narration of their paths into adult life. As the project progressed, we began to recognise the potential impact of our verbatim

in Performing care
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Jobs Theorising the engendered nation 23 whether overtly or covertly, as normatively a male terrain, a masculine enterprise. By contrast, since the mid-1990s there has been a virtual boom in genderand-nation studies by women critics, including Susan Andrade, Nelufer de Mel, Marjorie Howes, Deniz Kandyoti, Anne McClintock, Sangeeta Ray, Rajeswari Sunder Rajan, Florence Stratton, Kumkum Sangari and myself. These critics have examined in close-up, if from different perspectives, and with respect to different constituencies (Africa, South Asia, Ireland, the

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Hamlet, adaptation and the work of following
John J. Joughin

which survive over a long period of time, but those works which in doing so maintain their originary power and thereby serve to extend the ways in which we make sense of them.4 In this respect, as Fortier’s distinction suggests, it makes little sense to speak of the ‘accuracy’ of adaptation. Yet this of course raises a series of related issues: why is it that, even in the case of contemporary evaluations of the playwright’s work, some Shakespearean adaptations remain more memorable or significant than others? More problematically still, even if we acknowledge the

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Between Adorno and Heidegger
Joanna Hodge

antinomy of reason but with respect to Kant’s analyses of imagination, time and judgement in the first and third critiques. Adorno repeatedly returns to the critical philosophy of Kant and especially the analyses of the third critique, reading the division between aesthetic judgement of artworks 222 Reflections and teleological judgement of natural processes as concealing the possibility of a thinking of the processes of history as an elided combination and subversion of the difference between these two. Heidegger, in his study, Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics

in The new aestheticism