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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

pissed off with Valenti. I stayed out of the debate as best as possible, but there is no doubt that Valenti’s intervention hurt the film with respect to the Oscars. I met Valenti some years later and made up with him. He was a likeable man, however his position was that when it comes to Johnson, you don’t tread there. I think that Valenti’s opinion was to some extent shared by some of the other studio heads, who anonymously expressed the view that Warners had acted irresponsibly.4 Warners took a lot of heat over JFK. The combination of that pressure, with the limited

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

encouragement from the studio showing a loyalty to their director that few others command, completed his fourth editorial pass at Alexander with a version titled The Ultimate Cut, bringing to an end a near-​decade-​long desire and struggle to shape this personal epic to the best of his abilities. The auteur credentials that have produced loyalty and respect from studios and actors alike are augmented by other industry insiders also who know him. He has built and retained a reputation 17 R 6/​7/​2012 TriStar Warner Bros. Warner Bros. Warner Bros. Disney Sony Warner Bros

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

between urban and rural communities in their historical as well as contemporary sense, as well as highlighting the decay and interiority of rural America. The visual possibilities offered by the remote south-​ western town clearly help develop the theme of isolation, although Stone is not building a simple duality between socially and economically impoverished hinterland and the metropolitan antithesis. Instead he allows Bobby’s arrogance to project a more nuanced perspective on the mutual lack of empathy and respect offered by either world to the other. Bobby’s initial

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

of talk radio, Kunz suggests, as either a legitimate campaign against the disintegration of a certain kind of American C or po ration s culture of respect and integrity, or the pandering to a base interest in demeaning entertainment.21 In short, the film poses the question: is talk radio part of the solution or the problem? At least some of the negative media response to Natural Born Killers was predicated on the conclusion that Stone and his film were prominent examples of the problem about declining media standards, rather than an authentic effort to call

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

, our talking about it in New York … it is no longer a film about the machinations of Bud Fox circa 1987 … I am not interested in making a film about that same person trying to score 23 years later. But there is something about this generation that I know is different from what I saw in the 1980s. I have to respect that, and as a filmmaker represent that to the best of my knowledge and my heart. Perhaps at Fox you have not worked with directors like me, I’m not sure, but without being immodest, I think, in that vision, lies the success of this movie. And the good

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

power to a ‘respected business leader’, Pedro Carmona.55 Three days later the same paper, having absorbed the news that a wave of popular unrest had returned Chávez to power (and perhaps also remembering that it was not, despite appearances, the mouthpiece of the American administration), recanted in these terms: 105 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne Paul Krugman, Professor of Economic and International Affairs at Princeton University, writing in the Times on the same day, lamented the fact that the US administration had appeared content to voice no opposition to

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Clare Woodford

explains in the quote that opens this chapter, is about overcoming the usual cynical reaction to human imperfection with a commitment to seeking happiness regardless. Furthermore, with respect to Dienstag’s concern about the voyeurism of the viewer-subject, the uncomfortable “magazine photograph” kiss at the end of the film alerted me, as viewer, to every audience

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
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Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

feeling that this is ‘their’ newspaper appealing to ‘their’ generation and interest group. The following quote from the Nottingham Herald, a rival city newspaper to the Evening Post, is typical in this respect. ‘Do you remember the old Nottingham picture houses or have fond memories or experiences of a night at the flicks? If so, write to us’. 28 In this example, the newspaper clearly signals the

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

’, the Athenian orator who suffered from a speech impediment as a boy (evoking the ironic comment from his wife that ‘That was in Ancient Greece. Has it worked since?’). Filmed in an overpowering, suffocating, low-angled close-up, again with a distorting wide-angled lens, the therapist is represented from Bertie’s point of view as a threatening figure, whose assaults on Bertie’s self-respect prompt the

in The British monarchy on screen
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs
Andrew Higson

in various ways and takes various forms. Firstly, it can be represented in terms of naked power – the power that the monarch wields, the power to make things happen, to issue demands that are acted upon, to use physical force. A second means by which national and even global authority and respect is achieved in these films is through the strategic creation of an awe-inspiring image by surrounding the monarch

in The British monarchy on screen