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  • Manchester History of Medicine x
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Coreen Anne McGuire

demonstrated that it was clearly created as part of an effort to improve the nation’s physical fitness, with the military particularly in mind. Dreyer started the book with the assertion that the First World War had made physical fitness an issue of national importance. He prophesied that: ‘it is only when the meaning of “the normal” with respect to these measurements is understood, and when the limits of the normal have been properly defined, that it will be possible to study with any prospect of accuracy or success the deviations from the normal’. 29 Dreyer categorised

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

Health was developing a government-sponsored hearing aid, which had not been announced to the public at that point. The quotation below outlines the Post Office’s commitment to telephony for all and highlights its acknowledged expertise in hearing-assistive technologies at this period. The present position in this respect is very different from that which existed before the war when the original enquiry was proposed, as at that time the Post Office was working practically single-handed. It now seems likely that almost all deaf people will become users of the

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

B) cost £1 more (rental per annum) than the older model. This was not acceptable to users who felt they were being increasingly penalised for their hearing. For example, Mr Mousley, director of the Birmingham company Charles Winn & Co., was outraged at the expense of the more powerful amplified telephone, and refused ‘to pay any additional rental in respect of it’, and threatened in a letter of July 1938 that if the matter was not given immediate attention he would take the case up with the Postmaster General. 106 He was especially irate at having to pay £3 at

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

maintaining them. 121 As this chapter has emphasised, the heterogeneity of respiratory disability experiences proved challenging for the development of standardised treatments. This historical analysis highlights the importance of prioritising patient voices today, especially when making judgements about quality of life. Caution in this respect is highlighted by ‘the disability paradox’ explored in Chapter 2 . That is, the fact that many disabled people rate their quality of life as good or excellent although external observers imagine them to have an ‘undesirable daily

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Coreen Anne McGuire

and work, this view contributes to our understanding of why illness does not affect long-term well-being. Illness provides us with a context and opportunity for the kind of reflection and revaluation that are the condition for and prelude to happiness. 105 This section therefore reinforces the need for epistemic humility with respect to our pre-theoretical judgements about disability. Furthermore, if part of our theoretical task is to analyse the norms and practices (and in particular the instruments of medical science) which shape why we take certain bodies to

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Nursing and medical records in the Imperial War in Ethiopia (1935–36)
Anna La Torre, Giancarlo Celeri Bellotti, and Cecilia Sironi

hinder their religious worship, indeed you should facilitate them and foster all external manifestations of respect to what is above, to which they are accustomed. You must always respect women. You should not get too familiar with the natives, but always treat them with the same character, severely punishing any attempt, however slight, to teach them European respect.33 The 384 volunteer nurses, despite being part of the Italian Red Cross, were providing help and assistance to the Italian Army, as if they were part of the Army.34 Military reports show charts of

in Colonial caring
Duncan Wilson

the face of increasing secularisation. Ramsey and other theologians did not claim that interdisciplinary debates were necessary because procedures such as IVF raised unprecedented moral dilemmas. They instead believed that IVF touched on longstanding moral questions such as ‘respect for life’, but argued that collaboration was needed because these questions had become hard to resolve in secular societies that lacked ‘a common morality’.2 Crucially, these theologians emulated their predecessors by positioning themselves as ancillaries to doctors. They did not

in The making of British bioethics
Guerrilla nursing with the Friends Ambulance Unit, 1946–48
Susan Armstrong-Reid

share the burden of suffering of another, to help restore his sense of self-respect and integrity and to restore his faith in love and good-will through a practical demonstration of human sympathy and brotherhood. Convinced of the error of the way of violence, Friends seek to make love the basis of their relationships with others.1 Statement of the Peace Testimony in the Service Contract for the Society of Friends Ambulance Unit (FAU) Introduction In 1946 British surgical nurse Elizabeth Hughes and American public-health nurse Margaret Stanley eagerly anticipated

in Colonial caring
Colonialism and Native Health nursing in New Zealand, 1900–40
Linda Bryder

much as her training.’61 These comments by Bagley 92 Native Health nursing in New Zealand and Anderson suggest that initially at least Māori were quite wary of these newcomers. Māori women had the advantage of knowledge of the language and customs but some historians have suggested that unless they returned to their own iwi (tribe) they were not given much respect, and that European nurses commanded more respect.62 This was not the case with Akenehi Hei, who appeared to be well received wherever she went, as she herself wrote, ‘They seem pleased to see me among

in Colonial caring
Natasha Feiner

view’ – other matters were consistently brought up by both sides. As Bowhill noted after meeting with both parties in September 1954, ‘the questions of operations, schedules, etc. loom very largely into the picture’. In this respect, he noted, operators had ‘a dual capacity, one for the good of their aircrew and one for their good name’, while trade unions were ‘out to improve the conditions of the aircrew’. 31 Fatigue could not, as Bowhill's notes make clear, be considered in isolation as it related directly to

in Balancing the self