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Murdo Macdonald

powerful imagery that seems to reflect that culture. What is wrong with stereotypes is not that they exist (indeed they normally correspond to some aspect of reality), but that they are selective and inflexible, that is to say they fail to reflect the plural nature of any culture. A particularly interesting example of stereotyping with respect to Scottish art is the over-use of the painting by Sir Henry Raeburn of Colonel Alastair Macdonell of Glengarry. This is one of the images that has stood in for the wider body of Scottish art for many years. It is an interesting

in Across the margins
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The ‘outside’ in poetry in the 1980s and 1990s
Linden Peach

inadequately given the space available, the variety of work that became available in these decades. It hardly needs pointing out that the poetry scene has changed since the publication of British Poetry Since 1970, in which Blake Morrison stereotyped the published poet as writing from a ‘nostalgic liberal humanism’ with ‘strong respect for “traditional” forms, even strict metre and rhyme’ (Jones and Schmidt 1980: 142). Morrison said as much two years later in the introduction to The Penguin Book of Contemporary British Poetry (1982: 11). But, as Robert Hampson and Peter

in Across the margins
Revolutionary nationalism and women’s representation in Ngugi wa Thiong’o
Elleke Boehmer

as well as women, it should be added).10 His own protestations notwithstanding, he has increasingly sidelined the colourful crowds of A Grain of Wheat (1967) with their songs and ribald badinage in favour of single dominant personalities who stand as points of moral focus in his texts. Significant in this respect is his report ‘Women in cultural work: the fate of Kamiirithu people’s theatre in Kenya’ (1983), in which the ostensible pro-woman stance is rather obviously grafted onto a fairly straightforward factual account of the experience.11 Related inconsistencies

in Stories of women
Louisa Atkinson’s recasting of the Australian landscape
Grace Moore

A botanist, journalist, taxidermist, and fiction-writer, Louisa Atkinson (1834–72) was the first Australian-born woman to publish a novel, and a stern critic of violence in the name of progress. Gertrude the Emigrant (1857) appeared when its author was only twenty-three, but by then Atkinson was already an accomplished nature writer and a highly respected botanical illustrator. 1 She had also begun to pen short stories for the local newspapers, and went on to publish five more novels (an additional novel, Tressa’s Resolve , was published posthumously

in Worlding the south
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Jobs Theorising the engendered nation 23 whether overtly or covertly, as normatively a male terrain, a masculine enterprise. By contrast, since the mid-1990s there has been a virtual boom in genderand-nation studies by women critics, including Susan Andrade, Nelufer de Mel, Marjorie Howes, Deniz Kandyoti, Anne McClintock, Sangeeta Ray, Rajeswari Sunder Rajan, Florence Stratton, Kumkum Sangari and myself. These critics have examined in close-up, if from different perspectives, and with respect to different constituencies (Africa, South Asia, Ireland, the

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Gill Rye and Michael Worton

self is also clearly manifest and, indeed, foregrounded in the work of a significant number of the contemporary French women writers discussed in this volume. The authorial self as narrator or protagonist is subject to the same tensions and negotiations as other aspects of the self – above all, in relation to her readers. Sophie Calle’s experiments with her/self both challenge and implicate the reader in an ethical relation to the text, in which respect for the other and the self is precisely at stake. In Detambel’s L’Ecrivaillon, the writing self is embodied, only to

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

elsewhere. Like the travelling journeyman of the Middle Ages, referred to by Walter Benjamin, bringing back tales of far-flung places, Mistry’s work as a whole, with its repeated image of journeys of various kinds, combines ‘the lore of faraway places, such as a much-traveled man brings home, with the lore of the past, as it best reveals itself to natives of a place’.1 Rohinton Mistry was born into the Parsi community of Bombay on 3 July 1952. He was the second of four children, three boys and a girl. (His younger brother, Cyrus, went on to be a respected playwright in

in Rohinton Mistry
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The adolescent girl and the nation
Elleke Boehmer

child within the family as embodying an exploited, unformed potential that signifies the colonised also. From its opening pages the novel unfolds a disturbing family drama in which the eldest daughter Louie, the focaliser, seesaws between her allegiance to her father Sam Pollit, based on her respect for his knowledge and authority, and her attachment to her abjected stepmother Henny, founded on the gender loyalty. Accompanying this unsteadiness, the novel’s underlying national identifications are subtly split – divided between, on the one hand, the United States with

in Stories of women
The paradoxes of sustainability and Michel Houellebecq’s The Possibility of an Island
Hannes Bergthaller

nature would yield a commensurate increase of human autonomy. The more we learn about the natural world, the greater the margin of freedom we enjoy in constructing a human world where the dignity of the individual can find respect. Neo-Malthusianism confounded this logic: in applying the principles of scientific naturalism to the human species itself, it had arrived at an account of the latter according to which scientific truth now demanded the curbing of emancipatory aspirations and a relinquishment of individual autonomy. The Brundtland Report (and the discourse of

in Literature and sustainability
Johnnie Gratton

for every photograph, being a condition at once imposed (by the rectangular edges of the shot when first taken, edges themselves dictated by the format of the film in the camera) and assumed, changed into something chosen (by framing, trimming, cropping, etc.). In this respect, Calle may well be a postmodernist, but in her work thus far she has remained steadfastly pre-digital, an artist who likes to play with evidentiality rather than virtuality or computer-manipulated imagery. As something ‘set up’ or staged, the project–situation is artificial, a quality reflected in

in Women’s writing in contemporary France