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Susan M. Johns

his monastery. In this respect women are portrayed as having a beneficial influence. Avice, the daughter of Herbrand, who married Walter of Heugleville, is praised for her ‘advice and wise counsel’, her care for ‘widows, waifs and the sick’, as well as her beauty. She was ‘most fair of face’, ‘well spoken and full of wisdom’; he praised her prudence and her ‘golden tongue’.26 She acted as a civilising influence on her husband and ‘restrained him from his earlier folly’. Indeed, Orderic copied her epitaph, which was composed for her by ‘Vitalis the Englishman’. Her

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Susan M. Johns

from within the family.52 The family hierarchy was mapped out in economic terms, which could also have a symbolic aspect; this tends to confirm White’s suggestion that kinship positions were demonstrated by countergifts. 113 noblewomen and power Yet countergifts also illustrate networks of hierarchy beyond the family since women received countergifts from tenants/vassals. In this respect they also reinforced the place of women within social hierarchies within the community. When Gunnilda de Sturmi received her sheep and sums of money from Margam Abbey she did so

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
The Rotuli de Dominabus et Pueris et Puellis de XII Comitatibus of 1185
Susan M. Johns

that in the thirteenth century widows were charged more often than other grantees for wardships, but were not exploited unduly by the Crown in this respect, and were generally charged small fines slightly below average.69 So these headline figures, suggesting that over 80 per cent of widows with children in the Rotuli de Dominabus had not fined for the custody of their children, represent a minimum and should be treated with care. It is hard to know how many children had been in their mother’s custody and had died prematurely, and whether those of age have not been

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

individuals who are listed as having been cured of some affliction by miracles eighteen were women.43 In this respect this 2 : 1 pattern of imbalance in women : men miracle cures is a phenomenon that applies to other twelfth-century saints.44 Women’s testimony and role as sources of information on the saint are therefore one way in which they could influence the shape and content of the text. Georges Whalen has shown that in Goscelin’s Life of Edith statements of women’s theological equality in Christ were employed where women were the majority of witnesses to allay fears

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

perhaps reflects a greater legal concision in the techniques for recording property conveyances. For example, if the greater title to land was due to inheritance rights, the opening clause of a charter granted by a woman might contain a filia phrase. This is not status-specific: women of all ranks are 72 countesses described as ‘daughter of ’ in their charter opening address clauses. It may be termed a filial description and was applicable to men also. Inheritance rights then give greater status and self-defining gender parity, since in this respect noblewomen

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Enigmas, agency and assemblage
James Paz

, to delay the moment of penetration for as long as possible. The runic riddle around the borders of the front panel is especially complicit in this, since it takes as its subject the materiality (not the inner contents) of the three-​dimensional object. Like the front, the back panel could be described as neat. The challenges it poses are different to those posed by the bewildering right or left sides, but the effects are similar. The border text is especially interesting in this respect. It can be seen, straightaway, that the text looks different to that found in

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
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Donna Beth Ellard

, children, and the family has been, in large part, an unknown and under-studied aspect of the societies and cultures of the early medieval North. In the wake of Philippe Ariès's 1962 Centuries of Childhood , which argued that medieval parents were generally dispassionate towards their children, medievalists began to examine the topic, and Mathew Kuefler was the first to challenge Ariès's assertions with respect to families in early medieval England. 9 Examining documentary

in Dating Beowulf
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The change in mentality
Simha Goldin

Jews. The first story shows that the Jew who converted to Christianity did not really convert; the second emphasizes that the Jew who converts to Christianity was not a ‘pure Jew.’ In this respect, the second story is similar to passages we have found among the Ashkenazic hasidim, stating that the soul is at times misplaced within the wrong body; thus, the soul of the son of Rabbenu Gershom Meor ha-Golah was not a Jewish soul. It is self-evident that, in order to complete the discussion of converts to Christianity from the twelfth through the fourteenth centuries, we

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
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Simha Goldin

sacrificing her life? This discussion refers in practice to jus primae noctis, mentioned in the Talmud with respect to the Hasmonean or Roman period; the answer given in the Talmud is that one ought not to publicize this fact, as there may be women who would consent willingly, and hence would not be allowed to return to their husbands.25 The question asked in the Middle Ages concerning this matter was whether the principle that one is required to sacrifice one’s life in three cases (idolatry, sexual licentiousness, and bloodshed) also subsumes the case of rape by a Gentile

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
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Robin Norris

ourselves whether we are showing respect for the established scholarly discourse on race, citing minority voices, and – most importantly – listening to medievalists of colour, as we have been asked to do. 51 Notes 1 The Finnsburh episode is one of the most famous digressions in Beowulf ; the narrator recounts how the scop tells this story for

in Dating Beowulf