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Steve Sohmer

affable than any Prince vnder heauen. In which respect of her owne vertue and not his desert, it pleased hir so to humble the height of hir judgement, as to grace him a little whiles he was pronouncing, by these or such like tearmes. Tis a good pretie fellow, a lookes like an Italian ; and after hee had concluded, to call him to kisse her

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

heaven or hell. 16 Marking the anniversary of a loved one’s death, perhaps first commended to early Christians by Tertullian (AD 211), remained then as now a rite of respect for the deceased and a salutary exercise for the living. This tradition of annual commemorations, commonplace in early Tudor England, may have lost its standing in the liturgy but remained bright in living

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

being a Jew and daughter to a money-lender. But Jessica nowhere shows disdain for Judaism per se , nor does she exhibit any hint of Christian religiosity. Besides, money-lending was one of the few legitimate occupations open to the Jews of early modern Venice, and Shylock appears to be a respected member of the Jewish community. 56 However, if one puts Jessica’s words into

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

understand concepts of cultural production and reception as these register in early modern English drama. 6 In this respect my argument is highly unusual, since most studies in this area start from the point of the supposed absence of visual culture in an iconoclastic post-Reformation England blighted by lack of knowledge about the Italian visual arts. 7 Frederick Kiefer opens his study of the emblematic

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion
Chloe Porter

period. 43 Apelles’s claim that in an image which is not to be ‘misliked’ by authority, ‘imperfections’ must not be left out, suggests that a state-authorised representation will always be in some respect incomplete. Yet Apelles also indicates that a mimetic image of an authority figure must depict the process by which perspectives damaging to that authority figure are concealed. This

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

considerably easier by the death of Wither’s enemy, Northampton, two months before the publication of the Satyre), Wither had earned the respect and admiration of his peers. In his own person, Wither alludes to this newfound fame in his “Postscript to the Reader,” commenting, “It is very true (I know not by what chance) that I have of late been so highly beholding to  Opinion,  that I wonder how I crept so much into her favour” (Wither, Shepheards Hunting, 188). Within the fictional world of the eclogues, the shepherds wax even more effusive about Roget’s new fame. In the

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

on the social experience of reading or writing satire, specifically with respect to the making of meaning. Many of the theoretical comments on satire refer to and analyze what I am calling “direct satire,” which we now call simply “satire,” because greater freedom of expression in Western democracies since the late seventeenth century has diminished authors’ need for a toolbox of indirect satirical methods. Indirect satire flourishes under repressive conditions, complicating comments such as Ralph Rosen’s discussion of ancient satire, in which he asserts “the

in Spenserian satire
Chloe Porter

, Haydocke implies that painters are sufficiently skilled but do not ‘worke’ in a way that utilises their full abilities, given that the ‘buyer’ does not give any economic incentive or the encouragement of praise, respect and high expectations. The patron, in Haydocke’s view, is the source of this inert dysfunction in making; because the buyer cannot ‘judge’, the painter does not ‘worke’ to a sufficient

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama