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  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
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Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

Britain a respect for ‘human rights and human needs’. 93 As Jan Pettman points out, ‘Human rights have long been associated with a western, liberal and individualistic approach to rights’. 94 Naipaul consciously represents his ideal of the individual as being grounded in ‘metropolitan assumptions about society: the availability of a wider learning, an idea of history, a concern with self-knowledge’. 95

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

politicians finally confronted the tricky question of introducing manhood suffrage. The key issue for parliament was how to have manhood suffrage and also respect the rights of property-holders, when there were so many Maori. They were now well behind their fellows across the Tasman. Manhood suffrage would seem to make separate Maori electorates, introduced when voting for settlers was through a property qualification

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

more respected correspondents (notably the Hon. Hubert Howard, killed by a British shell at Omdurman, and G. W. Steevens, whose death from typhoid in Ladysmith was described by Colonel Park as ‘a terrible loss, both to the Daily Mail and the public’ 11 ), others remained deeply sceptical of the profession. In the Sudan Colonel Archibald Hunter objected to the presence of war correspondents, ‘1stly on

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Edward M. Spiers

conditions, particularly in respect of dress, fire-power and mobility, 18 the outcome was scant consolation for the soldiers involved. If they were well fed (graphically depicted by Price in his sketch of a sentinel standing on 2,000 cases of corned beef), generally healthy, and able to enjoy shooting game in the environs of Taungs, 19 they had little to show for the expedition itself. Bored and isolated

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Charles V. Reed

, informing them in a ‘Circular’ that his permission did not constitute permanent settlement and that they were required to respect his paramountcy. 20 While the farmers had petitioned Moshoeshoe for this right, proof that they recognised his authority in the territory, they soon claimed ownership of the land as property, which had never been Moshoeshoe’s intention. In 1843, the Governor of the Cape, George

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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Katie Pickles

. Figure 9.1 Processing with the wreath to the Cenotaph, 1951 National Meeting in Ottawa The biggest silence in the history of the IODE is in respect of the underlying importance of Canada’s southern neighbour. The influence of the USA, as became very evident during the Cold War

in Female imperialism and national identity
The BBC’s Caribbean Voices
Glyne Griffith

Critical in this respect was the question of language. Swanzy’s espousal of regional forms embraced a vernacular manner of writing that transgressed the cultural norms which, in other arenas, were propagated fiercely by the BBC. Figueroa, who as a reader on the programme was caught in the crossfire of these controversies, goes on to say: One is

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

respect to the administration of the colony in which they were based. This included arrangements that purposively limited the influence that the Agricultural, Medical or Veterinary Departments had over the research agenda of these new laboratories, on the grounds that the technical personnel of these departments were not well qualified in research. It is important to note, that in terms of the work that was done in these laboratories, and also some British universities, there was often a lot of short-term, practical problem solving. Elite British scientists did not

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

The Colonial Office representatives had their answer ready. They blandly replied that ‘the aboriginal inhabitants of the Colonies were all British subjects, and, as such, could qualify for the franchise equally with others’. The APS retorted that, while this statement was a token of the feeling of the Government with respect to ‘native tribes’, those who were closely acquainted with the real position

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

in both languages and I feel that the Order should do the same in this respect’. 17 By 1975, however, some booklets were still being published in English only. The postmaster-general’s special assistant announced that the Post Office could not help the IODE with its work; a polite way of telling them that their booklet was no longer suitable, because chapters had been placing the IODE’s English

in Female imperialism and national identity