Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • "ruling elite" x
  • Manchester Religious Studies x
Clear All
Open Access (free)

hinterland.11 Crucially, popular opinion in favour of more severe action against witches was never so widespread nor so vehemently articulated – even during years of hardship – that the council felt obliged to accede to it.12 The Rothenburg evidence thus suggests that those areas most likely to be characterised by a restrained pattern of witch-trials in early modern Germany were those in which a significant majority of the ruling elites came to realise that the social, economic and political stability of their territories was likely to be damaged rather than strengthened

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Open Access (free)

will make a significant addition to this small but important corpus, thereby adding weight to Briggs’ idea that areas which did not experience large-scale witch-hunts may well have been the early modern norm rather than the exception. In the chapters that follow I will demonstrate that complex and mutually reinforcing sets of beliefs and social, political and religious priorities held not only by the ruling elites but also by the lower orders of Rothenburg and its rural hinterland interacted to keep enthusiasm for prosecuting witches at a low ebb at all social levels

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
From the ‘militant’ to an ‘immunised’ route?

challenge of extremist Jewish elements has gradually decreased. The credit for this turn of policy goes to the increasing commitment to democratic values of ruling elites and their fear of forfeiting public legitimacy by responding with too heavy a hand to the representatives of one of the groups constituting the polarised Israeli society. However, this novel approach will founder unless there is significant change in the empowerment of the democratic underpinnings of Israeli society. The various chapters of this book present evidence of the significant incongruity that

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Attitudes towards subversive movements and violent organisations

State’s relatively liberal response to the most sophisticated and brutal Jewish terrorist organisation the country has known was a result of exactly the same circumstances which led it to react to marginal and minimally threatening movements with much more severity and ironfisted measures. The ruling elite and the designers of Israeli defence policy opted not to respond to the Jewish Underground on account of the threat it posed or the severity of its actions, but rather on the basis of the political and public clout to which it had access. The

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Slander and speech about witchcraft

Germany that they managed to overturn this stipulation and make released witch-suspects pay their own costs, see Rummel, Bauern, Herren und Hexen, pp. 32–35. 100 RStA Interrogation Book A906 (unpaginated), 25 August 1668. 101 RStA Interrogation Book A875 fols 192r–98v. 102 RStA Steinach Village Acts A739 fols 449r–450r, 463r–463v, 464r–465v. 103 See p. 128. 104 Ruling elites elsewhere also sent out this deterrent message to their subjects. In Munich in 1608, for example, the authorities issued an ordinance threatening those who denounced others as witches with

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Open Access (free)
Witchcraft and the symbolics of hierarchy in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century Finland

of the ruling group. But equally, it might serve as a vehicle for criticism and complaint, thus providing a valuable opportunity for malcontents to vent their dissatisfaction with, and opposition to, the ruling élite.33 16 Beyond the witch trials As Stuart Clark puts it, ‘witchcraft was constituted by an act of revolt’, and represented the opposite of perfect government.34 In some European laws, including the Swedish Rural Law of 1442, witchcraft appeared among the statutes against treason (högmålabalken).35 Vidskepelse was considered as inversionary as

in Beyond the witch trials