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Robert Murphy

Gentleman (1957) and Dickinson’s Queen of Spades (1948) and Gaslight (1940). The high estimate put on the English films of Joseph Losey, the determination to disrupt the aura of reverence around the British Documentary Movement, the questioning of the importance of Free Cinema and scepticism about the status of The Third Man (1949) as a masterpiece, were shared by other young critics, particularly the

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography
Paul Henley

‘structures’, sometimes defined in terms of social relations, sometimes in terms of cultural concepts or intellectual principles, sometimes in terms of primary biological needs. But all that went out of the window under the impact of postmodernism, one of the key characteristics of which was a profound scepticism about ‘meta-narratives’, that is, abstract general theories of precisely the kind represented in anthropology by these classical social theories. Yet although English-language ethnographers may have come to reject the notion that social life is no more than the

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

‘deformed and transformed’ by its essential materialisation within mass culture. The attendant ‘collapse of memory’ that Nora posits is based on a premise that memory is a matter of retrieving and reliving experience rather than something that is bound in, and structured through, representation and narrative. While not all would agree with Nora’s romanticised notion of spontaneous memory, there is enough critical scepticism felt

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Pence

scepticism towards narratives of progress, how then does the progressive view of temporal consciousness implied by the derogation of nostalgia remain so readily acceptable? Perhaps nostalgia is less a problem here, than the nostalgia implied by negative interpretations of the disposition. It is on this ground of memory that I wish to bring Jameson and Egoyan together. For the latter, memory and technology seem closely

in Memory and popular film
Mandy Merck

developments signalled by the English revolution (religious scepticism, political contractarianism, scientific empiricism and an interest in what would now be called social psychology) included a sustained philosophical discussion of fame, variously articulated as ‘honour’, ‘reputation’ and ‘esteem’ by Thomas Hobbes, David Hume and Adam Smith. Hobbes was an English royalist forced to flee the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

itics Stone saw shocked him –​the consequences of the civil war, as well as the social and economic reach of Cold War policy –​but he knew that there was exciting material for a film too.11 However, following the trip, there was still no way to finance the film.12 In March 1985, Stone’s father Lou was hospitalised, and within a few days passed away. It had been Lou Stone’s scepticism about his son’s ability to write that had fuelled the fires of Stone’s military stint in Vietnam. He later recalled that the reconciliation he had with his father was not all that he

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

about broader institutional accountability had still not been answered. The scepticism that had underpinned Salvador’s critique of US foreign policy was grandstanded both in Stone’s use of President Eisenhower’s farewell address and referencing of the military industrial complex, and in the pivotal scene involving District Attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) and X (Donald Sutherland) in JFK. Banks and the armaments industry were the beneficiaries, it is suggested, of Kennedy’s removal, and Stone pushed the suggestion further in Nixon by characterising malign forces

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

correspondent serve as extreme examples of a culturally shaped agreement within the corps of journalists: we don’t think too much about feelings in this business (see Melin-Higgins 2004). 136Exposed emotions, as this chapter shows in a variety of ways. First, however, I will step on the brakes a bit and problematise the basic concept once more. Scepticism – media scandals, do they exist? In my meetings with the journalists, it became apparent that a few of them felt called into question by me as a researcher. Among other things, my introductory e-mails had aroused negative

in Exposed
Recent films of David and Judith MacDougall
Paul Henley

the interference of the local state in the subjects’ way of life. Whereas in the East African cases, local administrators had been seeking to sedentarise the pastoralists, in Sardinia government agencies are seeking to restrict the activities of traditional shepherds in order to preserve the mountains as a supposedly ‘natural’ environment that will be attractive to tourists. Another theme reminiscent of the earlier work is scepticism about the benefits of a school education: the shepherds are aware that education can be highly advantageous for the individual but

in Beyond observation