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Open Access (free)
Louise Amoore

6 Introduction T he mood is shifting in the contemporary globalisation debate. Only a few years ago, talk of the contested and politicised nature of globalisation would have met with scepticism from those who emphasise the sheer economic power of globalising forces. The orthodox popular and academic representations of globalisation have for several decades sustained the image of a powerful economic and technological bulldozer that effortlessly shovels up states and societies. The very discourse of the ‘competition state’ (Cerny, 1990) effectively sanitised

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
From an ‘infrastructural turn’ to the platform logics of logistics
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

legitimate and giving them the veneer of being solutions to a problem rather than its cause. An international agreement would make things ‘more fucked’, rather than less. (Beuret, 2017 : 259) And while Chakrabarty's scepticism about the geographies of scientific expertise may or may not be well justified, there is always a danger that the flaws of the geopolitical present might prompt an unintended politics of the global future of similar nihilism. In contrast perhaps, several of the

in African cities and collaborative futures
Luiz Eduardo Soares

Guimarães (a federal deputy, and then president of the Chamber of Deputies), holding up the new constitution, the new social contract – the sign of his triumph in the National Congress – and the indifference of the people, with an ingrained scepticism of a system that encouraged inequality and the continuation of societal injustice. On one hand there was the institutional language of the state, and on the other there were the still audible echoes of ancestral ontological dualism, the delayed eloquent vibrations of the unsaid and the persistence of historical traumatic

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

programme, arguing that the state-owned banks should be privatised (OECD, 2001: 11). Far from abandoning past institutions and practices in favour of radical deregulation, the German debate revives past scepticism of shareholder value and renegotiates within a distinctive industry-finance frame of reference (see Schröder, 1996; Jackson, 1997; Moran, 1992). Labour IPE’s engagement with labour in the global restructuring debate has tended to assume that, while capital ‘promotes’ globalisation, labour essentially represents a social force with the potential to ‘resist

in Globalisation contested