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Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

in favour of emotional appeals to reassurance and fear (see Chapter 3 ), the Home Office has met with further scepticism. In what follows, we explore these different experiences and viewpoints, focusing on the ways in which the theatricalised performances of the state emerged in the particular moment of border control materialised by Operation Vaken. Through our research we have been able to delve into the effects of the state performance

in Go home?
The past, present and future of the English Defence League
Hilary Pilkington

, most talked rationally about their ‘respect’ for him, in particular for the fact that he ‘knows his stuff’ and that he had carried on despite the pressures on him and his family that accompany the leadership role. At the same time, neither leader was beyond criticism. There was scepticism about some of the stories of hardship and persecution endured by the leaders (Ian, Tim) and one respondent felt Tommy was ‘way over his head’ with his ambitions to move into politics (Michelle). Thus, when the movement was effectively functioning without either of its leaders in

in Loud and proud
Adaptive trials for intractable cancers
Anne Kerr, Choon Key Chekar, Emily Ross, Julia Swallow, and Sarah Cunningham-Burley

NICE give their guidance. We also encountered considerable scepticism and concerns about the trial when we engaged with lung cancer practitioners involved in recruitment. This was linked to a general sense of the difficulties of working with very unwell patients, difficulties with implementation and a vague sense of beleaguerment with the bioeconomy of which the NHS is a part. As another consultant noted: I think

in Personalised cancer medicine
Open Access (free)
The oddity of democracy
Rodney Barker

The unique ambivalence of democracy as a form of government and politics is the identity of the mobilised population as both rulers and subjects. Democracy depends not only on good government or good governors, but on the political role of a demos of active citizens. A democratic polity requires a democratic society, characterised by equality of identity in all its dimensions. The ideal identity of a democratic citizenry is composed of polite but limited deference, and robust scepticism of authority.

The possibility of disrespect and satire is both least necessary and most possible in democratic societies, with demonstration and, in its widest form, carnival as the last resort for asserting democratic identity.

The collision between equality and inequality, association and distinction can be vigorous in democracies, as representation not only exemplifies but exaggerates identities cultivated through association.

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic
Laura Chrisman

whether, in contrast, he is arguing for slavery’s basis in irrationality. The relationship and his argument are mystified and obfuscatory, and all that is clear to me is Gilroy’s desire to invite scepticism towards rationality’s emancipatory qualities. His own systematic isolation of slavery from any economic context adds to this ambiguity, and his argument at the end of The Black Atlantic for the linkage of Jewish Holocaust thinkers (including the Frankfurt School) and their experience with black diasporan experience does nothing in itself to elucidate his position

in Postcolonial contraventions
Gene-expression profiling in early-stage breast cancer
Anne Kerr, Choon Key Chekar, Emily Ross, Julia Swallow, and Sarah Cunningham-Burley

with the arguments presented by contributors to the consultations, shaped NICE guidance, released in December 2018. During its final meeting, the NICE Diagnostics Advisory Committee reported scepticism about the applicability of TAILORx results to the UK. Many of those who avoided chemotherapy in this study would not have been routinely offered it in a UK setting, demonstrating that even so called ‘gold standard’ evidence is not always translatable to other health systems, affording clinicians, patients and regulators flexibility in interpretation and practice (NICE

in Personalised cancer medicine
Open Access (free)
Piercing the politics of silencing
Hilary Pilkington

activists. In this chapter, that experience is shown to be one of a politics of silencing in which attempts to articulate grievances are met with accusations of racism and respondents learn to ‘keep your mouth shut’. This constraint on political space compounds a wider disengagement from the formal political sphere and a denial of the ‘political’ nature of activism. Such disengagement, it is argued here, is not rooted in a traditional far right, anti-democratic ideology, however, but in an experientially based scepticism about the functioning of contemporary formal

in Loud and proud
A naturalistic approach
Gilberto Corbellini and Elisabetta Sirgiovanni

are characteristics long observed by scientists, philosophers and sociologists during the period in which science was a model of knowledge. In addition, according to thinkers who are politically very different from one another – such as John Dewey, Michael Polanyi, Joseph Needham and Karl Popper – science and democracy share epistemological and ethical–political aspects. In particular, science and democracy both require tolerance, scepticism, rejection of authority, respect for facts, freedom of communication and free access to results. More specifically, the

in The freedom of scientific research
Open Access (free)
Universalism and the Jewish question
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

progress has always been distant and difficult and faith in progress has not become any easier. Signs of barbarism were acutely visible in the 1990s in the mass murder of Muslims in Bosnia and Kosovo and the simultaneous genocide in Rwanda, and more indirectly indicated by the silence, if not effective collusion, with which these catastrophes were largely met in the ‘international community’. In addition, the scepticism with which many leftist groups and

in Antisemitism and the left
Open Access (free)
Laura Chrisman

our own praxis.15 And another kind of political rehabilitation issues from Robin Kelley in his discussion of black diasporic identity-formations: Too frequently we think of identities as cultural matters, when in fact some of the most dynamic (transnational) identities are created in the realm of politics, in the way people of African descent sought alliances and political identifications across oceans and national boundaries.16 The roots of much postcolonial delegitimation of the political lie in an absolute opposition to the state, and a corollary scepticism

in Postcolonial contraventions