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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

rational disbelief to the same irrational and superstitious ideas for which it condemned Otranto : enlightenment understanding, it proposed, necessarily acts as ‘a charm’ to ward off ‘infatuation’. The Monthly Review 's striking combination of superstition and empirical scepticism in this instance evidences, in Diane Long Hoeveler's phrase, ‘the rise of ambivalent secularization’ in the latter half of the eighteenth century. 30 The literary gothic, for Hoeveler, is the product of the shift between religion-dominated early modern European society to more secular, less

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

’. 74 Owenson's increased reliance on the literary gothic as her career progressed is in keeping with her growing scepticism about the potential for political stability in Ireland. It also fits in well with conventional readings of the evolution of the national tale as a form. Both Ina Ferris and Katie Trumpener suggest that, from its inception in 1806, the national tale was influenced by but distinct from the literary gothic, preserving that difference for several years before the gothic dramatically (re)introduced itself. Ferris thus claims that Maturin's The

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

is convincing, as is her scepticism regarding the novel’s ending as representing a restoration of order. Heathcliff’s determination to destroy the Earnshaw and Linton familial lines has been partially realised; certainly, there are no Lintons left as Cathy Linton has become a Heathcliff and is on the verge of becoming an Earnshaw. Neither, however, is there any real order; the two large estates are

in Gothic incest