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Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

This chapter returns to the question of how women writers, specifically of a younger generation, theorise and re-emblematise the nation in their work. Whereas some women writers choose to distance themselves from the nation as extraneous to their concerns, Yvonne Vera and Arundhati Roy are representative of a subtly different approach. In the face of neocolonial disillusionment and the erasures of identity threatened by globalisation, they extend the ‘revisionary scepticism’ concerning the homogenising nation they share with their male counterparts, yet strategically play off its different narratives – of patriliny and matriliny, of modernity and tradition – against one another. Avoiding the stance of spokesperson and the all-commanding epic voice, they reframe the male-defined co-ordinates of national selfhood in relation to other modes of situating identity, such as those of region, environment, belief and sexuality, without however refusing the nation altogether. The chapter also offers an intertextual commentary on Roy's first and to date only novel, The God of Small Things, and of her non-fictional polemic against transnationalism.

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

art and science and healing medicine, and so large a part of all that makes life beautiful’.15 The Great War was not only a paradox; George Bernard Shaw described it as a ‘monstrous triviality’. While Shaw was driven largely by his scepticism concerning the motives of government and public morality, Bertrand Russell described the conflict as ‘trivial for all its vastness’. We have witnessed both Russell’s despair for mankind and his hope that the lesson of the conflict would produce (via individuals) a ‘different spirit’: a calmer, creative state of mind in contrast

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

departments of the same institutions. Norquay_01_Intro 4 22/3/02, 9:30 am 5 Introduction The last decades of the twentieth century witnessed the emergence of what we might call the ‘spatial imagination’ and the growing realisation of its absolute centrality to human experience (Soja 1989). This development is not only connected with the growth of widespread scepticism towards history in general and institutionalised historiography in particular, but also with a number of factors which have combined to put pressure on the historicism which has dominated western

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Gender and a new politics in Achebe
Elleke Boehmer

, but to change its enunciative style: to develop social responsibility, a newly gendered image of power, not a little scepticism and a broader support base – in general to ‘widen the scope’ (AS 158). The leaders need to approach the ‘owners’ of the country in order to embrace and take into their bosom certain of their number. In keeping with the leitmotif of the novel, in the anthill that survives after the fires of the harmattan, Beatrice, seer and leader, inspirer of a select new group drawn from various social sectors, also serves as the queen who maintains the

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
The Republic and Northern Ireland since 1990
Michael Parker

scepticism and republican frustration intensified. In early 1996 the Provisional IRA ended its ceasefire. It was only restored after Labour’s victory in the Westminster General Election of May 1997. Evidence that Tony Blair, the new Prime Minister, viewed Northern Ireland as a priority can be seen from meetings with David Trimble of the UUP and John Bruton, the Taoiseach, which he hosted on successive days soon after his arrival in Downing Street. His Northern Ireland secretary, Mo Mowlam, repeatedly stressed the need for a new ceasefire and the government’s keenness to

in Irish literature since 1990
The structures of migration in Tales from Firozsha Baag
Peter Morey

, interpretation for the reader is guided by the blend of Catholicism, sexuality and repression, woven into her narrative. The ghost first appears early on Christmas morning when Jaakaylee returns from midnight mass. We learn that the other, younger ayahs have gone off somewhere with their boyfriends. Her mistress and master, bai and seth, react with scepticism when awoken by their unnerved ayah. Bai is angry, but seth responds with good humour which Jaakaylee is soon able to account for: the audible creaking of their bed carries the sounds of intimacy, as the household settles

in Rohinton Mistry
The ambivalence of queer visibility in audio- visual archives
Dagmar Brunow

: 359). Overall, archivists might be hesitant to classify the persons portrayed in the footage in terms of their sexual identity. Given the history of criminalising or pathologising LGBTQ persons, the reluctance to tag archival holdings as LGBTQ-​related is quite understandable. The scepticism about the usefulness of ‘naming’ can either be the result of latent or manifest homophobia among archivists or a means to acknowledge the risk of ‘naming’ as a way of reducing shifting identities to a single classification. The metadata on Filmarkivet.se is mainly derived from the Swedish

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Debatable lands and passable boundaries
Aileen Christianson

father, not the mother. If the national ideal is constructed around primarily male concerns or ideologies, then commitment to those wide general concepts is likely to be difficult, tinged by scepticism, ironic dismissal, or feelings of exclusion or incompletion. ‘Scottish’ is tempered or altered by ‘woman’. And if Scottish is the ‘other’ to English, with England used as the dominant reference point, and woman the ‘other’ to man, Scotswomen have felt a double otherness, a double marginality, or ‘double democratic deficit’ as the political scientists name it (Brown 2001

in Across the margins
The representation of violence in Northern Irish art
Shane Alcobia-Murphy

pointing to the real thematic focus of the novel: the scepticism regarding the novelistic medium to represent violence and to respond to the Troubles. McNamee’s text is a metafiction, a novel about the crisis of novelistic representation and avoids the unwanted designation of ‘Troubles trash’ through its self-reflexivity and intertextual use of differing genres. The author employs five key strategies to foreground his own intense unease with the linguistic medium. Firstly, McNamee uses a plot element – the severing of a victim’s tongue – to state overtly his main

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

-emblematise the nation in their work. Whereas some women writers choose to distance themselves from the nation as extraneous to their concerns, these two writers are representative of a subtly different approach. In the face of neocolonial disillusionment and the erasures of identity threatened by globalisation, they extend the ‘revisionary scepticism’ concerning the homogenising nation they share with their male counterparts,47 yet strategically play off its different narratives – of patriliny and matriliny, of modernity and tradition – against one another. Avoiding the stance of

in Stories of women