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John Marriott

-century literature. It was not just that personalized accounts of (self) discovery provided the narrative structure of the first novels, but also that the combination of extreme scepticism and naïve empiricism constituted the self-conscious critical theory necessary for their emergence as a genre. 15 With Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels the boundaries between travelogue and fiction

in The other empire
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45
Katie Pickles

extremely anxious to place these people in the Dominions’. 6 The IODE felt that Canada could afford to ‘select prospective settlers with the greatest care’ so that they ‘are not to become failures or add further to the relief rolls’. 7 Despite such scepticism, however, in general, the IODE’s preference for British immigrants and a British-based society remained unchanged. In a 1938 Vancouver radio broadcast

in Female imperialism and national identity
The BBC’s Caribbean Voices
Glyne Griffith

lives of those ‘who had had a raw deal’, and shared too a scepticism about the spurious claims of a – metropolitan-driven – universal aesthetic. Calder-Marshall argued in terms of the need for a literature rooted in ‘the life and thought of a particular time and place’, while Swanzy made the same point by invoking the need for ‘local colour’. In 1946, during his first year as editor of the programme

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

reviewing the experiences of some thirty-five officers and men from all the British infantry units and support arms, it will be possible to gauge whether they had any insights on these and other aspects of the campaign. Wolseley’s scepticism about the resolve, reliability and martial prowess of the coastal tribes, particularly if required to fight in the bush, was widely

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
The canadianizing 1920s
Katie Pickles

canadianization define more clearly what it meant to be situated in Canadian space. With an imperial narrative still strong, the IODE’s response was pragmatic gendered work with immigrants, emphasizing skills above rhetoric. This was also because, with racial prejudices running high, there was scepticism about how successful canadianization could be, and it was still hoped that immigrants would be British

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

activists maintained a notable silence on Maori political rights. When suffrage was debated in the legislature, some Maori representatives raised doubts about enfranchising women. In 1892, Major Wahawaha, in the Legislative Council, expressed his surprise that the European men would propose such radical change, and voiced his scepticism about its value. The ‘Natives in Olden Times’ had upheld men’s dominant

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

appeared, alongside it, a more rigorous scepticism toward the anti-fascism of the mainstream left, which in turn would take him, in 1939, to a principled refusal to support the Allied cause. It was from these years that Padmore’s peculiar pre-eminence as the arch-agent of African decolonisation became established. From 1935 he settled in London – first setting up in Guilford Street, which is where J. J

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Edward M. Spiers

above), sinking wells and felling trees for the railway line. As temperatures rose, morale sagged: Lieutenant Francis Lloyd (Grenadier Guards) regarded the long march to an evacuated Tamai as a ‘fiasco’ and reported widespread scepticism that the railway to Berber would ever be completed. 88 Those who had hoped to come ‘home smothered in glory’ were disabused; instead convoys regularly passed and

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

administration, also employing ancient and modern tropes, corrected her assumption that the Haya had already entered the brave new world which was proving so difficult for the post-war government at home to create. Combining conservative scepticism about the character-weakening effect of welfare with long-established racial preconceptions, officials reminded Huxley that one of William Beveridge’s five giants

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

Forster, a clerk in the employ of the East India Company, viewed such narratives with a degree of scepticism. ‘Travellers stand accused’, he stated, ‘of adopting a figurative and loose style of description.’ 42 His journey may include places ‘removed from the eye of European observation’, but he could reassure the public that the work ‘has no tendency to discolour or misrepresent truth’. Relying on

in The other empire