Search results

Open Access (free)
The bodyand counter-revolutionary warfare inapartheid South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

8 Death and dismemberment: the body and counter-revolutionary warfare in apartheid South Africa 1 Nicky Rousseau As resistance intensified in what would turn out to be apartheid’s final decade, security forces in South Africa began covertly to exe­cute opponents extra-judicially, despite a formidable arsenal of security legislation and a state of emergency from 1985 to 1990.2 A noteworthy aspect of these executions is that the modes of killing varied, sometimes along regional lines, or according to the particular security unit involved. Disposal of the bodies

in Destruction and human remains
Towards atypology of the treatment of corpses of ‘disappeared detainees’ in Argentinafrom 1975 to 1983
Mario Ranalletti

the Argentine state in most known cases. Soldiers, members of the security forces (police officers, gendarmes, municipal prison staff, and National Prison Service personnel), and civilians were organized to kidnap, torture, murder, and pillage, and to destroy and/or hide the corpses of an as yet indeterminate number of people accused of belonging to ‘the subversion’. In the terminology used at the time, this was the ‘war on subversion’. The military junta remained in power until 1983, when demo­ cratic elections were held. Between 1984 and 1985, an investigation

in Destruction and human remains
Regnar Kristensen

science and criminology. As the contributions to this volume show, the corpse is not always the end of the story. On the contrary, as we shall see, a corpse still holds the power to stir up more death. The overall argument is that the brutal treatment of corpses transgresses the spheres of national security politics and the simple spread of terror. Corpses are instead seen as a social force that enchants politics and socialises religion. They make the past present 164 Regnar Kristensen and foresee possible futures. Drawing on popular Catholic practices I stumbled

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Death, landscape and power among the Duha Tuvinians of northern Mongolia
Benedikte Møller Kristensen

other so called feudal practices – such as the open-air funeral – were prohibited (see Farkas 1992). As in other parts of Mongolia, the Duha remember socialism generally as a time of ‘prosperity, stability and security’ (Pedersen 2011: 48), as it marked a jump from a life of severe poverty and insecurity7 to a life with the material surplus and social security of the socialist state. However, citizenship also forced the Duha to adopt a new way of life, where modern/socialist ideologies, laws, practices and consumer goods were introduced and mixed in new ways. This

in Governing the dead
Élisabeth Anstett

Politburo setting up a central administration devoted to the running of the ‘re-education through labour’ camps scheme, be taken as the date of the birth of the Soviet concentration camp system? Or should we consider that the latter began with the readiness, stated as early as January 1918, to use deportation, internment in concentration camps and forced labour as the principal means of dealing with political opposition?11 What we can be sure of is that this rapidly established and long-lived co­existence of spaces of detention controlled by the state security organs

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos
Iosif Kovras and Simon Robins

2012). The Mediterranean Sea kills would-be migrants regardless of their legal status, not discriminating between refugees and economic migrants. One of the key features of EU border policy is that the border is not constructed territorially, but by the sea itself as a potentially fatal barrier to entry. Sea borders remain the entry point of choice for the majority of ‘irregular’ immigrants to the EU (Frontex 2012), while according to data from Frontex, the EU agency for external border security, the Aegean coast remains the second most common entry point for

in Migrating borders and moving times
Corpse, bodypolitics and contestation in contemporary Guatemala
Ninna Nyberg Sørensen

afterwards and dump the body (Manz 2004). Women suffered 99 per cent of reported sexual attacks (CGRS 2006). Many of those who took part in the counter-insurgency campaigns were trained in sadistic methods of utterly destroying the enemy. During the most violent years of the armed conflict soldiers often cut open the wombs of pregnant women and hung the foetuses up in trees or smashed them against rocks. In addition, thousands of indigenous women were the victims of mutilations and sexual violence. Upon the signing of the peace accords, many former members of the security

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Mass violence, corpses, and the Nazi imagination of the East
Michael McConnell

genocide and the dictates of rear-area security.10 The outcome of such intellectual exchanges was a series of handbooks issued to soldiers and police stationed in the East. These publications quoted Stalin’s call for a partisan war behind the Front and cast the Soviets as guerrilla fighters par excellence. They reiterated the message that the entire civilian population was suspect, as women, small children, and even the elderly, traditionally non-combatants, often worked for the partisans as spies and couriers. In order to drive home the message that the occupational

in Destruction and human remains
Missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

testimonies to the TRC related to the unjustly buried: funerals banned or disrupted, bodies treated callously or just missing, demonstrating how not even death enabled the raced body to escape apartheid’s Missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa   177 bounds. Family members, mainly women, expressed their longing for ‘just one bone’ to bury.9 In a certain sense, though, the first TRC exhumation arose not in direct response to these pleas but more fortuitously following disclosures by security police, applying to the TRC for amnesty. Over a fifteen-month period

in Human remains and identification
Alexander Korb

the summer of 1941 in which the Ustaša interned and murdered Serbian and Jewish prisoners. One of these camps was located on the Mediterranean island of Pag and another close to a hamlet called Jadovno in the coastal mountains. In neither camp had any buildings, such as crematoria, been constructed. Here, the question is whether we can demonstrate that the Ustaša planned the mass murder in advance, or whether it was not, rather, mounting brutality which led to the security guards ­massacring a large number of the prisoners. Another question in this respect is

in Human remains and mass violence