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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

to smartphones, but to the corporatisation of the military itself.14 Indeed, the Edward Snowden story that Stone was drawn to by 2014, explicitly revealed the extent to which the use of commercial contractors had become integral to the emergence of a ‘global security state’.15 The USA had become, in Stone’s words, a ‘corporate oligarchy’, and war was now its stratagem of choice.16 With its emphasis on the maintenance of empire, the Untold History series helped lay the groundwork for Stone’s critique of the global security apparatus, and this in turn provided a

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

. As Stone himself confessed, it was another way of meeting with, and handling, his political engagement. ‘The move to documentary work is an effort to put pressure where I can best put it, even if it’s a reduced impact,’ he explained.23 It is true that neither Comandante nor South of the Border generated anywhere near the tumult that accompanied the production and release of a movie such as JFK. That high watermark of activism in his career eventually saw Stone giving evidence in Congress to the Subcommittee on Legislation and National Security in April 1992

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

greater indictment of the busted bankers and degenerate drug cartels. Certainly, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps offered a tale of betrayal, vengeance and redemption in the wake of the 2008 financial crash; but it barely scratched the surface of the minutiae of short-​selling and mortgage-​backed securities any more than the original Wall Street had got to grips with insider trading. So while the public continued to nurse grievances about the 2008 financial meltdown and the beggaring of government resources to fix the problem, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps was held

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

-​stories in the film concerning the background to Lee Harvey Oswald’s life, events at Dealey Plaza, Dallas, Texas on that fateful day, and a character otherwise known as ‘X’, but ostensibly based on Air Force Colonel L. Fletcher Prouty, around whom Stone built what he described as a ‘counter-​myth’ to the Kennedy assassination. The counter-​myth was that the American people needed to consider the possibility that Kennedy had been removed by a coup d’état ordered by unknown members of the institutional establishment, and carried out by people within the security services

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

up. The Guardian report was probably the most accurate. W. was a well-​respected movie; however, by the time the movie came out Bush had lost his bite. If the movie had come out two months earlier, while the debate was still about national security, the film would have done a lot better. By the time of release in October 2009, the debate had moved on to the economy. There was no participation or input from any of Bush’s close associates who were –​and are –​very secretive. There is still a lot that is still unknown about Bush and that era. Wall Street finished

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

the world, as well as more specific findings related to emergency response, border security and reporting lines within the various intelligence agencies. In measured, even muted language, the Commission recommended that the ‘War on Terror’ could not concern itself merely with military responses, concluding that ‘if we favour one tool while neglecting others, we leave ourselves vulnerable and weaken our national effort’.40 The message about moral leadership was thrown into sharp relief immediately on publication. Just a few weeks earlier in May 2004, investigative

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Robert Giddings

, gone down the road of revolution whereas the free world had taken the more careful democratic route. Its cautious consensual progress was consolidated in the post-war settlement, its modest optimism maintaining a fragile balance which typified the British ‘tone’ of the 1950s. In 1955 the American Edward Shils observed Britain’s security curiously in Encounter

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

, thus emphasising the need for a sovereign in times of political threat to cast aside all romantic ambitions that might stand in opposition to national security. In 1936, Edward VIII famously abdicated in order to marry ‘the woman I love’. In contrast, Davis’s Elizabeth puts her duty as Queen above her personal happiness. She is wedded to her throne just as Bette Davis was committed to her professional ethos

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Pat Jackson’s White Corridors
Charles Barr

the film is recording, and in a small way contributing to, the momentum that will lead to the creation of an uppercase National Health Service. After Western Approaches , Jackson spent six months preparing a film about the Beveridge Report – the weighty blueprint for a new system, NHS included, that would create security ‘from the cradle to the grave’, published in 1942 and widely discussed – but the

in British cinema of the 1950s
James Downs

: For nearly a year [the English] have been flocking to see a play called Watch on the Rhine , under the deliberate delusion that just Germans, as portrayed in that play, are flocking back from the security of the United States to fight Hitler underground. No such thing has ever happened, even once … the underground movement in Germany has produced no

in The British monarchy on screen