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Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

of new theories of sexuality and post-Freudian psychology, whose emphasis on the importance of sexual fulfilment pathologised those who were not sexually active (as well as those of ‘non-normal’ – that is, non-heterosexual – sexuality). Jeffreys quotes an article in the first issue of the feminist magazine Freewoman in November 1911, entitled ‘The spinster’: I write of the High Priestess of Society. Not of the mother of sons, but of her barren sister, the withered tree, the acidulous vessel under whose pale shadow we chill and whiten, of the Spinster I write … In

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

the nudist magazine, Sun Bathing Review (1933–59). Through these images I explore connections between sunlight, sexuality, and tanned skin. Many practitioners, government officials, and eugenicists greatly desired tanned skin for the British public, and manufacturers and tourist companies offered light for consumption in the battle against ‘sun starvation’. This, according to Hanovia’s pamphlet, was defined as the

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

perceptions of light’s effect on procreativity and sexuality. In Hanovia’s ‘Alpine Sun Lamp’ advertisement of 1937 ( Fig. 4.6 ), the layers denoting the emanating invisible light of the ultraviolet and infrared lamps descend onto the figure’s body. Like the ‘Vi-tan’ pamphlet cover ( Plate 1 ), we have little sense of the light’s physical penetration into the body: the contours of the light block and those of the figure remain

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

sexuality, the focus of Chapter 5 . The ‘art’ of light therapy There are long-standing art-historical precedents for imaging nudes in the sunlight, of mythical goddesses and biblical figures in pastoral or idyllic settings from the Renaissance onwards. Artists from Titian (1477–1576) to Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) treated the nude in the open air as standard aesthetic fare. By the early twentieth century

in Soaking up the rays