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Coreen Anne McGuire

in The History of Sexuality in which he argued that, from the seventeenth century, ‘there was an explosion of numerous and diverse techniques for achieving the subjugation of bodies and the control of populations, marking the beginning of an era of “biopower”’. 129 Biopower is power over life, constituted of two separate forms. 130 The first is concerned with the body as a machine, and the second pole is concerned with the body of species . It is the second form that is explored in this book through the context of early twentieth-century biomedicine. Hacking

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

them had worn corsets. Those who had worn corsets and tight dresses gave tracings like civilised women; those who has only worn loose dress gave normal tracings. 56 While costal breathing was thus largely regarded as an artificially created difference caused by ‘the evils of tight-lacing’, one of Ellis’s correspondents explicitly elucidated the links between thoracic breathing and sexuality. In what was acknowledged by Ellis as intended as a private letter to him, Dr Louis Robinson expressed his feelings that one of the reasons (and there must be strong

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
The hygienic utopia in Jules Verne, Camille Flammarion, and William Morris
Manon Mathias

, England is said to be ‘a garden where nothing is wasted’ and dung is explicitly highlighted as a source of fertility. 102 There is also a freedom and openness towards sexuality and the body in News from Nowhere that is absent in Verne's and Flammarion's novels. Morris's protagonist, William Guest, repeatedly responds to women on an erotic level, especially the central female figure, Ellen. Guest notices her scantily clad physique, for example, and comments on ‘her face and hands

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

ancient Greece in his work on the history of sexuality. 44 However, elsewhere Foucault does write about the historically specific emergence of ‘separate beings with separate selves’ in his work on penology in Discipline and Punish . Here he argues that ‘for a long time ordinary individuality – the everyday individuality of everybody – remained below the threshold of description’. 45 In any case, Hunt is absolutely right that notions of selfhood

in Balancing the self
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Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

: Proffering middle-class hygienics against the ‘dirt’ of Africa, modesty in contrast to discourses of unrestrained African female sexuality, and the beacon of a Christian medical science in the dark face of African disease and superstition, the European nurse in the first half of this century was positioned squarely at the nexus of race, class and gender politics in the arena of empire.18 Missionary nurses unsurprisingly occupy a considerable proportion of this book as it was often the missions that first introduced and provided Western biomedical healthcare to the

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Jane Brooks

anxieties. The presence of women in the masculine world of battle with intimate knowledge of the naked male body intensified fears of moral laxity.11 Long-­standing attitudes towards men’s susceptibility to women’s sexuality were difficult to erode.12 In order to avoid accusations of improper behaviour, the nursing profession had demanded a professional, that is, ‘impersonal’, relationship with patients.13 The development of a more human response to the soldiers’ sufferings to promote recovery contravened this policy. This chapter examines the nurses’ ‘use of self’ to

in Negotiating nursing
Dietary advice and agency in North America and Britain
Nicos Kefalas

.’  44 Carstairs attributes Hauser's popularity to his target audience, which was usually white, healthy and mostly middle-aged women. 45 This segment of the self-help market, Carstairs argues, was eager for knowledge on beautiful ageing and the preservation of femininity in old age: ‘Hauser was … drawing on a significant tradition of men teaching women, especially older women, on how to perform femininity.’  46 Additionally, Hauser's sexuality

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

and shaped their own ‘becoming’. 62 Moreover, as recent sociological and critical theoretical reflections on subjectivity and selfhood in Europe (and its empires) have pointed out, critiques of subjectivity and gender, race, (dis)ability, sexuality, class and intersectionality emerged from – and provided the basis for – new political and social movements with international focus, most notably feminism. 63 Such movements explored how social, linguistic and cultural

in Balancing the self
Bonnie Evans

through the body and were then repressed and redirected. In 1943, Susan Isaacs and Paula Heimann wrote an influential paper on the nature of ‘regression’, in which they outlined their understanding of the way that instinctual drives were frustrated or blocked and then regressed to earlier stages of development. Sigmund Freud’s theories on infant sexuality had taught that during

in The metamorphosis of autism
Jane Brooks

alleviate the spectre of unrestrained sexuality.4 Feeding work was 25 Negotiating nursing ­ uintessentially part of women’s domestic role, but during the Second q World War it took on political import as women fed the nation on rations and saved Britain from waste. Military nurses demonstrated that they too had the skills and ingenuity to scavenge, prepare and administer nutritious food to recover men for battle. The care of pain was crucial to patient recovery and yet, in the masculine space of war, the combatant was often reluctant to admit to it. Thus nurses needed

in Negotiating nursing