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Open Access (free)
Author: Janet Wolff

This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

other five siblings (including my grandmother) were born, and where Rosa had remained after her marriage. [ 126 ] hH In December 1941, Leonie received permission to move to Marseilles, to await emigration. She was installed in the Hotel du Levant, one of a small number of detention hotels used to house women refugees and children who were preparing to emigrate. Refugees were permitted to go to Marseilles once they had received their foreign visas. The men were in nearby Les Milles detention camp. Nearly two thousand internees left Gurs to be located at centres of

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

reported that Rose Hill, which had been a nursing home for two decades after Olive Shapley sold it in 1981, had become the first Didsbury property offered for sale for one million pounds. Austerity baby Lawnhurst, Didsbury, Manchester Henry Simon and family outside Lawnhurst, 1898 hH Lawnhurst is one of several mansions in Didsbury, built as family homes by wealthy industrialists and businessmen in the second half of the nineteenth century. Ernest Simon, later Lord Simon of Wythenshawe, was thirteen years old in 1892 when he moved with his parents and seven siblings

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

, and whose lives I’d love to know more about. His father’s cousin Emma (sister of Julie, the mother of Marcel who died in the French Resistance) was single, and lived with her widowed sister, and her sister-in-law in her later years. It was with them that my cousin Marlyse lived, in France, as a young girl in the 1930s. Emma is on the right in this photograph from 1953 (and I am in front, with Julie’s hand on my shoulder). More mysterious, and a generation earlier, is Emma’s aunt Minette Levy (1845–1919), my father’s great-aunt, oldest of nine siblings, whose grave I

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

of her years of anxiety, her feeling that she had to protect her parents, her inability to separate from them (especially her mother) and the need to be good and do well in school. My father was a refugee, not a concentration camp survivor, but many of his relatives died in the Holocaust, including his mother’s brother and sister and their spouses, and his father’s two siblings, one with her hushand. It seems very likely that the same disturbances pervaded our postwar lives. From some of the studies Karpf reviews: The Holocaust, it was claimed, had become the

in Austerity baby
Yulia Karpova

’ga Gurova suggested that the idea of disposability was barely known in Soviet culture. Coping with shortages, people constantly reused objects, or remade or exchanged them with friends and relatives (particularly children’s clothes passed to younger siblings or the younger children of friends). As a result, the ‘life of objects in Soviet culture was virtually endless’.103 DIY practices for prolonging this life were encouraged by the state through advice books and articles in popular journals. A KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT.indd 144 20/01/2020 11:10 From objects to

in Comradely objects