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Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

figures. The relationships between female characters and their brothers or brother-substitutes are often fraught with underlying incestuous desires that are expressed as hidden subtext or explicit incestuous love. In contrast to the potential for abuses of power with which father–daughter relationships are endowed by the nature of the familial bond, the relationships between siblings are grounded in a

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

definition of incest. Biologist William Shields contends that while extreme inbreeding is ‘associated with incest’, incest is defined only as ‘parent-offspring or full sibling matings’. 4 However, while children generally lose sexual interest in the siblings with whom they are raised, geneticist Patrick Bateson argues that people also tend ‘to choose partners who are a bit different, but not too different

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

, depicts twin siblings haunted by their mother. Polidori’s novel represents the mother as an erotic and ghostly figure, physically effaced while remaining maternal and seductive. In analysing these texts and their accompanying criticism it becomes clear that the figure of the mother tends to be characterised in one of two ways: either as overly maternal or non-maternal. Both of these characterisations, in

in Gothic incest
The plays of Ed Thomas and the cultural politics of South Wales
Shaun Richards

domestic rather than social, his characters frequently traumatised by the deaths of parents or siblings with the Norquay_09_Ch8 150 22/3/02, 10:04 am 151 The plays of Ed Thomas social and economic dimensions to those tragedies, while alluded to, never becoming central to the work. This is in striking contrast to the works of 1930s South Wales writers such as Lewis Jones, who has the protagonist of his novel We Live make the fervently socialist declaration ‘Keep close to the people. When we are weak they’ll give us strength. When we fail, they’ll pick us up and put

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Gender, sexuality and transgression
Author: Jenny DiPlacidi

This book demonstrates that incest was representative of a range of interests crucial to writers of the Gothic, often women or homosexual men who adopted a critical stance in relation to the heteronormative patriarchal world. In repositioning the Gothic, representations of incest are revealed as synonymous with the Gothic as a whole. The book argues that extending the traditional endpoint of the Gothic makes it possible to understand the full range of familial, legal, marital, sexual and class implications associated with the genre's deployment of incest. Gothic authors deploy the generic convention of incest to reveal as inadequate heteronormative ideologies of sexuality and desire in the patriarchal social structure that render its laws and requirements arbitrary. The book examines the various familial ties and incestuous relationships in the Gothic to show how they depict and disrupt contemporary definitions of gender, family and desire. Many of the methodologies adopted in Gothic scholarship and analyses of incest reveal ongoing continuities between their assumptions and those of the very ideologies Gothic authors strove to disrupt through their use of the incest trope. Methodologies such as Freudian psychoanalysis, as Botting argues, can be positioned as a product of Gothic monster-making, showing the effect of Gothic conventions on psychoanalytic theories that are still in wide use today.

Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

-kin are often co-reared. Sociologist Edward Westermarck argued that non-kin raised together during childhood form aversions to each other due to reverse sexual imprinting that makes marriages between non-blood-related siblings impractical and undesirable. 70 Such an effect is seen in novels like Sarah Sheriffe’s Correlia, or The Mystic Tomb ( 1802 ), Sleath’s The Orphan of the Rhine or the anonymously written Adeline or

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Sibylle Lacan’s Un père: puzzle
Elizabeth Fallaize

narrowly escapes falling to his death as the father catches hold of his clothing at the last moment. No other family member found the episode particularly memorable, but Sibylle is so transfixed by this heroic role for her father, that she reads her own attachment to the island of Formentera (‘Fort-m’enterra’(fort buried me)) as a re-enactment of the incident.The following fragment again evokes her father in a saviour role – this time when he intervenes on her behalf against her siblings. The fragment ends on the following remark: ‘Et si un père servait d’abord à cela: à

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Incest and beyond
Jenny DiPlacidi

and gender made in this book has implications for the convention’s treatment in other works; how, for example, does sibling incest emerge in twentieth-century Gothic novels such as V. C. Andrews’s Flowers in the Attic (1979)? With what set of concerns are depictions of cousin incest, aestheticised violence and abuses of power engaged in Joyce Carol Oates’s First Love: A Gothic Tale

in Gothic incest
Heidi Hansson

, parenthood and family but also raises questions about the meaning of origin: ‘Has the rain a father . . . What womb brings forth the ice?’ (n.p.). God as the Creator is speaking in the extract, which seems to emphasise and solemnise the matter of origin, but, on the other hand, since the Bible verses are about creation, about entities that were never born, the epigraph also seems to suggest that once something is brought into the world it has no family except, perhaps, for the similarity that exists between siblings like water and ice. The clearest indication that family

in Irish literature since 1990