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The ‘pathology’ of childhood in late nineteenth-century London
Steven Taylor

household chores or caring for younger siblings while their parents were at work. 26 In the case of this particular charitable home it might be assumed that the number of girls was a reflection of a middle-class desire to improve the respectability of the working poor and ‘improve’ the life chances of these individuals. Comments such as those that accompanied Annie C. who was impaired ‘owing to the careless habits of the mother – who drinks’, 27 or the statement that

in Progress and pathology
Christine E. Hallett

to individual siblings, sometimes to an ‘inner circle’ of close family members, and sometimes to a wider audience of family and friends. In 1915, her siblings persuaded her to have her ‘journal’ letters compiled into book form and submitted to a publisher. The result is one of the most authentic ‘voices’ of the First World War.22 Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front, published when the war was only a year old, won glowing reviews. It begins by recounting the thrill of travelling to France from Dublin on a troopship,23 followed by the tedium of

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Christine E. Hallett

paradis des blessés missionary and then a British staff officer; and moved in literary circles, enjoying relationships with members of the intelligentsia, such as Ford Madox Ford and Percy Wyndham Lewis. The extraordinary qualities of her writing owe much to her range of experiences and acquaintances.28 Born on 15 May 1886, Borden was one of four surviving siblings, and spent much of her time accompanying her brothers on expeditions, fishing trips, and games with other boys. Although something of a tomboy, she was also said to have been feminine in appearance and

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Britta Lundgren and Martin Holmberg

their decision to accept the vaccine. Their reasoning was that it was important to take the vaccine, that all siblings should have it, and this would be a way to protect other people or children who, for different reasons, could not take it. Among the officials interviewed, the importance of solidarity in order to reach herd immunity was also claimed, and for some this had ideological reasons. I

in The politics of vaccination
Dorothy Porter

The patient had always considered himself intellectually inferior to his siblings and family generally, never having achieved an equivalent level of academic success. He did, however, have a maternal grandfather who was a published poet, and he was related to a well-known Irish poet. No other changes occurred until, after twelve years of treatment, the patient began to show symptoms of depression, aggressive and volatile behaviour, along with grandiose ideas, paranoid delusions, extreme circumstantiality, over-talkativeness and pressured speech. After various

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Bonnie Evans

popular image of the child as a solitary thinker struggling to construct a personal understanding of the mathematical and logical properties of the physical world. But this image is now giving way to a view of the child being initiated into shared cultural understandings through close relationships with parents and teachers, as well as siblings and peers. 21

in The metamorphosis of autism
Bonnie Evans

milestones and indicators of child development in relation to autism. However, as with intelligence, genetic proof for autism had major political implications. The 1980s saw further work that supported the idea of a broad autism ‘phenotype’ characterised by impairments in social function. Reports from Britain and the USA found that siblings of children with the autism diagnosis often

in The metamorphosis of autism
Bonnie Evans

speech, manipulation and other characteristics were dependent on ‘strength of drive and attitude’ and ‘opportunity for learning’, and ‘personality development’ was dependent on ‘the relationship the child makes with his parents and siblings in a particular social context’. 132 This use of statistical models to track child

in The metamorphosis of autism
Bonnie Evans

1958 one eight-year-old girl was referred to the clinic and given a preliminary diagnosis of ‘childhood schizophrenia’. Her inpatient summary stated that she was hostile to her younger siblings, had a ‘speech defect’, could not write and had been excluded from school ‘after three weeks because she took no notice of anybody’. 90 On the reflex tests, she was found to

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Bonnie Evans

‘enormously strong’, causing a ‘stress of urgent unsatisfiable need’ if food or love were found wanting. 116 After these passionate experiences of early infancy, the child only slowly developed into a social being via daily interactions with parents, siblings and playmates where internal needs, wants and desires were ‘projected’ onto those other people in an

in The metamorphosis of autism