Search results

Corin Redgrave

. It wouldn’t stand the test now in terms of the authenticity of his accent. Funnily enough actors were not particularly bothered about that kind of authenticity then, and didn’t have the help of experts such as Joan Washington, experts who have made a study of phonetics, like Professor Higgins in Shaw’s Pygmalion , and in the sociology of accent. But in all other respects, it’s a very authentic

in British cinema of the 1950s
Outdoor screens and public congregations
Ruth Adams

Bakhshi, ‘Measuring cultural value’, Keynote speech delivered at ‘Culture Count: Measuring Cultural Value’ forum, Customs House, Sydney, Australia, 20 March 2012 , www.nesta.org.uk/areas_of_work/creative_economy/assets/features/measuring_cultural_value , p. 5. 43 John Urry, ‘Mobility and proximity’, Sociology 36:2 ( 2002 ), p

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

, ‘Reminiscence in Adult Development’, pp. 367–9. 12 Fred Davis, Yearning For Yesterday: A Sociology of Nostalgia (New York: Free Press, 1979), p. 31. 13 ‘Double Seats and Savoury Snacks’, Nottingham Observer (March 1984

in Memory and popular film
Gumboot dance in South Africa
Dana Mills

‘art can never be reduced to ideology or to sociological manifestation’ (Steadman 1995: 5). He proceeds to argue against the title ‘political play’, as ‘that label has connotations of a specific genre of theatre with didactic intentions … the relationship between politics and performance in South Africa can perhaps best be summed up by saying that the subject matter is usually so steeped in politics that politics does not require a mention’ (Steadman 1995: 5–​6). There need be no explicit political reference in a play for it to be political; its structures of

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

-orientated view of emotions, as sociologist Jack Katz argued almost two decades ago with the following exhortation: ‘A next challenge is to develop empirically grounded explanations of emotions as they rise and decline in the vibrant flow of social life’ (Katz 1999:3). It is fair to say that Katz’s call was heeded. Alongside the production of psychologically focused studies, a newly awakened interest in perspectives on emotion in cultural analysis, sociology, and social psychology became apparent during the early twenty-first century and had an impact on a number of social

in Exposed
Paul Henley

matters as sociological insight into their own society, reflections on the nature of God, and the expression of personal views and sentiments. But equally important are Llewelyn-Davies's long-standing relationship with her subjects, her obvious fluency in their language and her intimate knowledge of their society. This combination of factors enables her not only to frame succinct questions that generate interesting answers, but also to ask more difficult, sometimes even importunate questions, in a manner that seemingly does not offend, nor even surprise her subjects

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
The complexities of collaborative authorship
Paul Henley

and Dunlop themselves put it when commenting on the film some thirty years later. Though it was generally welcomed at the time for providing symbolic and sociological contexts, at least by some academic reviewers, it poses the dilemma that the Asches also confronted when cutting Releasing the Spirits , namely, how to provide sufficient context to make an event adequately meaningful for the viewer without burying the film in an avalanche of words. Notwithstanding the very extensive commentary in

in Beyond observation
The films of David and Judith MacDougall in Africa and Australia
Paul Henley

ironwood tree leaves in order to drive away the husband's spirit. So that she could provide explanations for the complex symbolic processes going on in this ceremony, Judith invited the widow, Geraldine Kawangka, to join her in the edit suite and comment on the rushes. This commentary was recorded and then used as a narration on the soundtrack of the final version of the film. It mostly works very well: it serves not only to provide the contexts necessary to understand the many different component parts of the ceremony from a religious or sociological

in Beyond observation
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

that takes place in physical meetings among people. These communication paths do not exist independently of one another; rather, they are messily intertwined. Both people in the immediate vicinity of the informants and persons at a greater distance from them reacted and acted on the basis of the mediated image. In this way, visibility became a factor whose presence was felt in everyday life. This both obvious and exciting interaction among different forms of communication is of little interest to John B. Thompson, who, in accordance with sociological tradition, is

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

sociological issues and created real characters. However, at the time Quentin was very pissed off. Quentin made his version of the screenplay more than available to everyone he could –​available to various fan magazines –​so it’s possible to look at the final version and see how it was developed. The point was, Quentin was very upset. I had never seen such a campaign of vilification. Natural Born Killers opened, coincidentally, at around the same time as Pulp Fiction [1994]. In fact Pulp Fiction had been screened at Cannes and from my perspective, the timing of Natural Born

in The cinema of Oliver Stone