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The ‘defending democracy’ in Israel – a framework of analysis
Ami Pedahzur

replace the voluntary networks. The sovereignty, or ‘statehood’, orientation took root in this country. Its leading proponent was Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, who subscribed to the view that the satisfactory absorption of ‘Israelis’ immigrating from the numerous and varied countries of the Diaspora required a coalescence of the different sectors and the cultivation of a political–sovereign perception. According to this view, the State’s interests stand above all organisational interests or groups making up these bodies. 28 In operational terms, the ‘statehood

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
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black magic and bogeymen in Northern Ireland, 1973–74
Richard Jenkins

. This uncertainty should also be understood in the context of the prorogation of the local parliament, Stormont, by the British government in December 1972. The Protestants’ bulwark, and the source of the legitimacy of their local sovereignty, had been removed at a stroke. Further themes, which emerged in the black magic rumours and the church material, and which there is no space to discuss here, mingle in drugs and sex. These dramatize

in Witchcraft Continued
Ami Pedahzur

-State era when all Jewish settlement in Israel was governed by a political elite originating from Eastern Europe. Members of this elite brought with them a worldview according to which only a centralist and strong state capable of mobilising its people could lead to the realisation of national goals, foremost among which was the need to establish a stable Jewish sovereignty in the land of Israel. In line with this vision, a centralised and paternalistic state or, as termed by Yishai, a ‘guided democracy’, was instituted in Israel. It was David Ben-Gurion, the first prime

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
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Roman ‘tyranny’ and radical Catholic opposition
S.J. Barnett

theocracy of the Papal States was accompanied by a widely held recognition that radical religious reforming movements were no longer to be encouraged. Quite sensibly, sovereigns did not wish to sponsor attacks on the legitimacy of Roman sovereignty, for in the fragile political conditions of Italy after 1815 – with revolutions occurring in the 1820s and 1830s – the Pope was more prudently seen as a conservative ally. Sovereigns knew very well that, in the hands of those sympathetic to republicanism, the reforming attack against Roman temporal rule might not be accompanied

in The Enlightenment and religion
Attitudes towards subversive movements and violent organisations
Ami Pedahzur

the more radical of counterinsurgent options at its disposal in an attempt to put an end to the internal struggle over sovereignty, as well as to bring about the dissolution of the militant Etzel and Lehi movements. The incident strikingly illustrating this critical step toward the assimilation of the ‘militant route’ or ‘war model’ was the affair of the weapons’ ship Altalena. On 22 June 1948 the army’s chief of operations ordered his soldiers to open cannon fire on the S.S. Altalena with the resolute intention of sinking the ship. This

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence