Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "sovereignty" x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
Charles V. Reed

sovereignty. In this sense, the nature of his rule was not a novelty to the political culture of southern Africa but the very essence of it. In effect, his kingship was an African invented tradition. A savvy political leader, Moshoeshoe won the fealty of his subjects through generosity, protection, and accommodation; he spoke both Sesotho and Zulu, enabling him to easily converse with most of his

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

World War, the government and private companies looked with increased interest to the resource potential of the north, combining economic potential with welfare and defence objectives in the region. Tapping into the economic potential of the north was a useful way for Canada to increase its presence there, both to confirm sovereignty over the land and to make money. In an imperial context, if Canada did

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

Rights, Ameliorating Their Conditions, and Promoting Their Civilization , the model laws laid down general principles of legislation based on ‘the indefeasible rights of every people . . . the natural rights of man . . .’, which entailed a people’s rights as an independent nation the sovereignty of which could be justly obtained only by fair treaty and consent, and of which every individual had a ‘right

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

culture. Along the way, a diversity of measures had been adopted to deal with the Indigenous peoples who had stood in the way of settler access to land in the early days of each settlement’s expansion, and to contain the threats that their continuing presence presented to colonial sovereignty and authority. Events of the twentieth century showed that possessing the power of the

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
The predicament of history
Bill Schwarz

political sovereignty marks the final end of colonial domination. This literal rendition is obviously necessary, but it remains partial. The extraordinarily creative assertion of West Indian thought in the middle of the twentieth century, which effectively encompassed – amongst other things – the making of the West Indian novel, presaged a more expansive conception of decolonisation, in which the end of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

settlements, however, it is important to note that the different franchise provisions cannot be read simply as a measure of colonial concern for Indigenous participation in the affairs of government or the economy. They also reveal the extent to which settlers felt secure in their authority and their claims to sovereignty over particular regions and over the land as a whole. It was clear that the taking of the land would not alone

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

lands and sovereignty. The rest of the vast territory remained under the control of the Hudson’s Bay Company, which, while trading with Indigenous peoples, left them otherwise little disturbed. Missionaries, however, were increasingly active in the territory, Catholics expanding from their original base in New France and Protestants, particularly American Wesleyans, moving in advance of Loyalists into the new

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice
Charles V. Reed

, knowledge, migration, military power, and political intervention’, as Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton argue, ‘allowed certain communities to assert their influence and sovereignty over other groups’. 6 In the British Empire, information itself, neither free nor evenly distributed, was regulated and controlled by the growing cultural resonance of racialised settler discourses, recently empowered

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

, Maori tribal groups were organised politically, glorified the warrior, and had for decades experimented with European weapons. On behalf of the British Crown, Hobson signed the Treaty of Waitangi with numerous Maori chiefs in February 1840, by which the British believed Maori had conceded sovereignty in exchange for the rights and privileges of British subjects and the protection of their lands and

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
‘A vote the same as any other person’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

, implying that band members who accepted enfranchisement would lose the privileges attaching to Indian status. 80 Convinced that it was the loss of privileges rather than the threat to sovereignty that lay at the base of Six Nations’ opposition, Conservatives urged Sir John to allay these anxieties. In a letter to the chiefs Macdonald sought to position his Party as the natural recipient of the Indigenous vote. Accusing his

in Equal subjects, unequal rights