Search results

disobedience, combining elements of street theatre, festival and what can only be called non-violent warfare’ (Graeber, 2002: 66). Such activities contrast sharply with traditional forms of protest associated with the social democratic Left and trades union politics over the last forty years. If nothing else, these protests have a very different feel about them. When compared to the prearranged march and rally, more recent protests certainly induce a sense of organic autonomy within their participants. Nonetheless, these tactics converge with the anarchist culture of

in Changing anarchism
Reflections on contemporary anarchism, anti-capitalism and the international scene

territory in between. They’re attempting to invent what many call a ‘new language’ of civil disobedience, combining elements of street theatre, festival and what can only be called non-violent warfare – non-violent in the sense adopted by, say, ‘Black Block’ anarchists, in that it eschews any direct physical harm to human beings. (Graeber, 2002: 66) The last tactic referred to concerns property damage of key symbols of capitalism – banks, shop fronts, cars – carried out by the ‘Black Block’. The ‘Black Block’ has its origins in a number of European anarchist and Western

in Changing anarchism