Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for :

  • "vulnerability" x
  • Manchester Film Studies x
Clear All
Open Access (free)

) searching for accommodation after her boyfriend Jerry (a cocktail of macho aggression and petulant vulnerability created by Laurence Harvey) is arrested for murder. Repeatedly recognised and rejected by landladies, Viviane eventually sees and answers the advertisement ‘Room To Let, No. 4 Albion Road, No References Required’. It turns out to be a boarding-house for unmarried mothers, run by unscrupulous and

in British cinema of the 1950s

1954), The Constant Husband and The Ladykillers (both 1955). His physique, plummy voice and controlled fussiness enabled him to play both warm-hearted characters and management types. As Jarvis Lorry he projects the decent paternalism required to safeguard such vulnerable fugitives from political chaos in France as Lucy Manette and her father. He is counterbalanced across the Channel by Christopher

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The early British films of Joseph Losey

a key moment, as a ‘scheming, spying informer’. The equation of the villain with the tactics of McCarthyism is explicit there, as is the idea of the hero as someone who has been falsely ‘victimised’ (though it is also suggested that his behaviour has made him vulnerable to that form of attack). Made with modest means in twelve days, the film remains essentially a crisp B-picture thriller, but with a

in British cinema of the 1950s

masculinity in crisis in Ice Cold in Alex (1958) is the absolute reverse of stiff upper-lip: he is as tremulous, sulky, simpering and vulnerable as James Stewart on a bad day, and indeed foreshadows Stewart’s performance nearly a decade later in The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), where, like Mills, he almost cracks up at the indignity of being bested by German superiority. Nor does nostalgia and nobility fit the impudent opening

in British cinema of the 1950s

feels greater or at least equal loyalty to Philip. This realization motivates her to try to build a stronger marriage with Philip. Elizabeth discovers that intimacy, however, is also a source of vulnerability. Later in the season, Philip is told to go to New York, where he meets with Irina, a former girlfriend from the USSR, the woman that he had to leave behind in order to accept

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Open Access (free)
Pat Jackson’s White Corridors

depth to their familiar personae, callow and flighty respectively. The new nurse is Petula Clark, poised between her child and adult careers, and coping well with some rigorously extended vulnerable close-ups as she listens to important advice, or watches the off-screen unbandaging of a mutilated face. Further down the cast list, reliable character players like Jean Anderson (as a nurse) and Megs

in British cinema of the 1950s
Separate Tables, separate entities?

and in her palpable vulnerability is as similar to John as the Major is to Sybil. There is ‘not much to choose between the two of you’, she adds, and in a moment of poignant self-abnegation that must have contributed to Wendy Hiller’s securing her Oscar as Best Supporting Actress, she urges John to go to her again because it is quite clear that ‘you love her’. The themes of Separate Tables come

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film

factor in struggle . . . if one controls people’s memory, one controls their dynamism’. 3 Memory, in this context, is seen as a political force, a form of subjugated knowledge that can function as a site of potential opposition and resistance, but that is also vulnerable to containment and ‘reprogramming’. In a more recent study, Marita Sturken draws upon Foucault but refines his conceptual position. Rather than categorise

in Memory and popular film
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf

everyday life. What we remember does not stay the same; memories are forgotten, revised, reorganised, updated, as they undergo rehearsal, interpretation and retelling. Moreover, the more important the event remembered, the more it is vulnerable to reconstruction, as it will be more frequently rehearsed, interpreted and retold. Halbwachs’ third point is to argue that remembering is always present

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)

seen ideological critique turn inward upon itself, nostalgia remains – nostalgically, of course – a sign of false consciousness, of individual and mass delusion leading to commercial, critical and political vulnerability. Beyond the various monuments, lieux de memoires , television shills in documentary form, fashion revivals, musical retreads, pop cultural recyclings, political atavisms, religious

in Memory and popular film