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Matthew M. Heaton

subject who was insufficiently “Other” – who spoke of being rich, of hearing voices through radio sets, of being powerful, who imitated the white man in dress and behaviour’. 23 In other words, Africans who deviated from their ‘traditional’ norms and blurred the arbitrary cultural boundaries between white European and black African were considered the most psychologically vulnerable segment of African

in Beyond the state
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

pattern of mortality. In the later colonial period, census results showed that as many children died between their first and fifth birthdays in Buganda as during infancy. In particular, Ganda children seemed especially vulnerable as they approached their first birthday and during their second year of life. This trait was first quantified in the late 1940s by Hebe Welbourn, one of the pioneers of community

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

. . .’. 25 Their uniforms, as Lieutenant J. J. F. Hume later conceded, had compounded this vulnerability, namely ‘scarlet jackets, white helmets, white pipe-clayed belts and equipment straps, pouches, etc.’. 26 Colley recognised that the disaster of the 94th had ‘changed the whole aspect of affairs. The loss of 250 men out of our small garrison was no trifling one, and the moral effect, of course

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Edward M. Spiers

defence against incursions of a bold and predatory enemy’. 65 Night after night Osman Digna’s forces, in small groups, attacked the scattered camps, by-passing the guards and arc lamps to hack and kill soldiers asleep in their tents. Newly arrived units were particularly vulnerable (the Australians suffered on their arrival in late March just as the 1/Berkshires had done in early

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

was too dangerous and that ways in which to bar Indigenes from the vote – if possible, without spelling this out in the legislation – would have to be found. South Africa was the only country in which, in all parts and throughout the whole period, the Indigenous people were numerically the clear majority. In the other countries, though the settlers were a vulnerable minority in the early years – as in

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

heavy casualties caused by withdrawing in daylight, and the vulnerability of Barton’s more extended brigade when it advanced without artillery support. 40 Soldiers tended to blame Colonel C. J. Long for losing the ten guns and Major-General Fitzroy Hart for his choice of formation rather than Buller, who was lauded for remaining in the firing line. 41 Similarly Buller evaded much of the blame for

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

arrangements foundered when typhoid swept the camp at Bloemfontein, the army recovered and depended, as ever, upon its support services to function effectively. Given the risks of men succumbing to disease and fever, especially when confined in cramped conditions, British expeditionary forces usually sought early and decisive battles. Soldiers rightly worried about languishing in camps or the vulnerability of

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

colonialism central to an understanding of the nature, the terms and the timing of the political rights conferred upon Indigenous peoples in each of our sites. These common features, variously experienced and expressed, hold together a comparative analysis that is otherwise vulnerable to the substantial differences between its component parts. Further, they establish the historical connection between the ways British and colonial governments

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Edward M. Spiers

/24th), ‘took everything they could carry and what they could not carry they burnt.’ 47 As Chelmsford promptly ordered a withdrawal from Isandlwana, and retired on to the defensive in Natal, his soldiers consoled themselves as they awaited reinforcements. Many counted their blessings, as they too had been vulnerable, possessing only seventy rounds of ammunition per man. 48 They extolled the achievements of their

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

interaction, a ‘barrier of self-consciousness’. This threatens ‘sterility’ for him. 30 His sense of vulnerability is perhaps heightened by his growing sense that he could not ‘make a living’ as a writer ‘by being regional’. 31 In The Enigma of Arrival the narrator notes with some chagrin that he had in the 1950s passed up an important theme, the ‘flotsam of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain