Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Barbra Mann Wall

documents provide a different record of activities during the civil war. Films, for example, can allow us to glimpse images of people not otherwise known to historians. First-person accounts of the impressions of sister-nurses and physicians, their activities, the work of Biafrans and the people they tended can be found in a film located at Raidió Teilifís Éireann Archives (RTE), Ireland’s National Public Service Broadcaster. This online archive holds hundreds of thousands of hours of moving-image and sound recordings, photographs and documents. Indeed, the Internet has

in Colonial caring
Mathew Thomson

. M. Winter, ‘Britain’s “Lost Generation” of the First World War’, Population Studies , vol. 31 (1977), pp. 449–66. 5 For example: Geoff Eley, ‘Finding the People’s War: Film, British Collective Memory, and World War II’, American Historical Review , vol. 106, no. 3 (2001), pp. 818–38; and Penny Summerfield, ‘Film and the Popular Memory of the Second World War in Britain 1950–1959’, in Philippa Levine and Susan R. Grayzel (eds), Gender, Labour, War and Empire: Essays on

in Posters, protests, and prescriptions
Open Access (free)
Robert Mackay

even the blackest towns was always one of the most beautiful, peaceful countrysides in the world’. It was the Nazi threat to this Britain that – or so the propagandist hoped – would call up a patriotic anger in the minds of the people and which they would fight to defend. Feature film makers appeared to be happy to fall in with this rather unbalanced picture of the country everyone was fighting for. Throughout the war films were made in which it was implied, as Orwell put it, ‘ that England is an agricultural country, and that its chap4.p65 164 16/09/02, 09

in Half the battle
Neil Macmaster

during the course of the war. Films were distributed by the SCA to army units and the SAS/SAU, which had some 400 projectors, to show to local audiences in village halls, women’s circles and other venues. In addition specialised propaganda units, the CHPT, copied in 1956 from American Loudspeaker and Leaflet Companies, began to M1822 - MACMASTER TEXT.indd 162 21/7/09 12:16:19 The propaganda offensive and the strategy of contact 163 deploy mobile cinemas, including a type of screen (cinéma jour) that could be viewed in the open air during daylight.42 SCA reports

in Burning the veil
Open Access (free)
Robert Mackay

the war for an hour or so and drink the medicine of laughter. And if proof were needed that escapist cinema was fulfilling a vital human need, the most popular of all films shown in the war (which happened to be from Hollywood) was Gone With the Wind – a war film of sorts, of course, but an exercise in escapism, none the less. It should be added that some films, such as Korda’s Lady Hamilton (1940), Carol Reed’s The Young Mr Pitt (1941), and Thorold Dickinson’s The Prime Minister (1941), contrived both to meet the demand for escapist costume drama and at the same

in Half the battle