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Janet Wolff

and work. And in those days too, there were the joys of the elegant Pittman’s shorthand, with its own compensatory aesthetic rewards.) And yet this life of efficiency has been paralleled – or perhaps it’s better to say occasionally interrupted – by repeated attempts at creativity. Over the years, I have from time to time taken piano and classical guitar lessons; enrolled in drawing classes; studied ballet and contemporary dance; joined creative writing groups and workshops. Nearly always, and even when my attempts were good enough, I managed to undermine this

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

notwithstanding – indeed, from everything I heard, more or less ignored. The gorgeous villas on East Avenue and nearby, including Eastman’s own home, now the George Eastman International Museum of Photography and Film, stand now as a reminder of a way of life for the city’s wealthier inhabitants. Rochester in the 1920s is vividly portrayed in Paul Horgan’s charming roman à clef, The Fault of Angels. The novel was published in 1933, and won the Harper Prize of 1934. Horgan, who died in 1995, is best known for his fiction and non-fiction writing about the American southwest

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

can’t even recollect. Three cheers for next one that features crap. And today a painter (!?) in Israel with abominations of figurative pictures. Anything you can do they can do worse. I tend to get tired these days, so my correspondence has suffered a bit. But today’s modern ’art’ on the guardian has given me a kick. what price art!? Wei Wei and all. To me it is either laughable or very sad. And so boringly dull. Piles of this, piles of that and piles of something else. Ernst Eisenmayer And, when I happened to mention that I was writing a catalogue essay for an

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

accidentally exposed an underlying theme. Or perhaps not so accidentally. Is there a certain ‘modesty’ in writing memoir through other people’s stories? I prefer to think of it, in fact, as obliquity. Of course this has been a story about my own Atlantic moves – both geographical and emotional. If others – Henry Norr, my father, the Sellafield workers, Richard Hoggart – take up more space than me in these pages, perhaps my marginality is a rather immodest device. The people I write about are mobilised by my narrative, and serve the purpose of telling my story. And yet there

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

3: Aliens For my first creative writing group, formed with three colleagues at the South Bank Centre in London in December 1987, I wrote about this photograph, taken in 1940 or 1941. I called the piece ‘Image of an alien’. But the really extraordinary thing about this photo is that he is right in the centre. Not only that. He is framed and displayed by the arch, projected, more than any of the other men, against the pale background of the sky. It took me a while to understand what was so unsettling about it. I thought it was the dislocating effect of seeing him

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

learning that Leo Levy had an extra two years of life. And of course – chillingly – this belated information brings the story back again to chemistry. To Primo Levi, also enslaved there, and to my father’s own connections with the German chemical industry. hH Article 116 (2) of the German Basic Law concerns the rights of descendants of those deprived of German citizenship on political, racial or religious grounds to apply for naturalisation. Now, writing in the immediate aftermath of the Brexit vote, I am compiling the documents I need to demonstrate my eligibility for

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

Austerity baby France and Germany the following month, many of these prisoners were released or transferred, and control of the camp was handed over from military to civil command. Just over three thousand people were interned there by the time the Baden Jews arrived in October. As Claude Laharie records, the population of the camp tripled overnight at that point, to a total of 9,847. Conditions at Gurs were dire, and during the winter of 1940 to 1941 were at their worst. Susan Zuccotti quotes the president of the Jewish community of Mannheim, writing after the war to

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

kind of social ‘phototherapy’, for me phototherapy acted as a kind of excessive, risky form of photography – a blinding, burning practice of ‘light writing’. 11 This relationship came to be less one of material resemblance or even material convergence than a material collision . Pleasonton’s blue-light therapy was but one of many, international examples of light therapy correlating to photography’s practices and its

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

the aid of ‘Vita’ glass in the lounge, while one of its halls provided phototherapy during the winter. 105 In the Times supplement, readers encountered a mix of images of natural and artificial exposures, with little sense that one was necessarily better than the other ( Figs. 1.1 – 1.4 ). It makes for complicated (visual) reading and resists the temptation of writing what Jordanova called a ‘seductive’ and ‘glamorised’ narrative. 106 Her

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

the auditorium of every theatre she sits, the pale guardian … She haunts every library … In our schools she takes the little children, and day by day they breathe in the atmosphere of her violated spirit. Austerity baby And Alison Oram quotes Stella Browne, a feminist sex reformer writing in 1917: I would even say that after twenty-five, the woman who has neither husband nor lover and is not under-vitalised and sexually deficient, is suffering mentally and bodily – often without knowing why she suffers; nervous, irritated, anaemic, always tired, or ruthlessly and

in Austerity baby