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Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas
Rachel Wells

through which to discuss photography’s own ‘writing with light’ (Barthes, 1984: 96). Indeed, just as Weileder’s practice suggests a fascination with the intersection of time and space, so Benjamin suggests that every photograph presents ‘space-crossed time’. If the photographic image is ‘dialectics at a standstill’, then, according to Cadava: it interrupts history and opens up another possibility of history, one that spaces time and temporalises space. A force of arrest, the image translates an aspect of time into a certain space, and does so without stopping time, or

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

process. New digital technologies also afforded us the chance to enact specific rhythms in the writing process. We worked quickly on this book as editors, by organising a series of book-sprints in remote areas in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, as well as across digital and virtual time-spaces. During this process, we collaborated on editing chapters simultaneously and jointly – composing the conclusion and introduction in shared Google Docs, watching and over-writing each other’s work. How we, during a shared yet sometimes haphazard time frame of days, hours or

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences
Thomas Sutherland

representations that Mapping the space of flows 183 are mutable and flowing and no longer fixed in time and space as ink on paper is. Writing has become liquid, and digital representations of meaning have begun to pulse and flow at an ever-quickening pace that militates against the pause and traction, ­concentration and reflection that meaning construction and knowledge production demand, and that print culture could facilitate. One is surely justified in wondering whether this emphasis upon the mapping of flows, rather than, or in addition to, routes and static locations

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia
Gavin MacDonald

computational time’s destructive effect on subjective, experiential time (Virilio, 1997; Mitchell and Hansen, 2010). Speaking broadly about this attitude, Adrian Mackenzie describes how ‘technological speed can give the impression that the future is closed, and that any experience of time grounded in duration and memory has been lost’ (2002: 1). For Manuel Castells, writing in the mid-1990s with then-current critiques of the postmodern in mind (particularly David Harvey’s (1989) The Condition of Postmodernity), ‘the culture of real virtuality associated with an electronically

in Time for mapping
Joe Gerlach

merely a way of writing-otherwise these mappings, of thinking 46 Ephemerality/mobility through how notions such as objectivity and drawings such as straight lines, while seemingly disciplinary and stifling, can actually be generative of a panoply of bodily dispositions, and micropolitical possibilities. Put simply, to achieve and trace a straight line for OSM in Witham, bodies must move, sweat, ache, meander and blister. They need to coalesce with non-human bodies and learn to be affected in the process. It is then the virtual potential of these cartographic bodies

in Time for mapping
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time
Cate Turk

digital form also has implications for how we might ‘date stamp’ them or order them temporally. Websites might be periodically updated but there is no one moment of publication as there is with a paper map. Indeed, digital media in general is complex in terms of temporality. Following Tim Barker’s writing about Time and the Digital, particularly his discussion of the philosophical work of Serres and Deleuze, it is probably useful to think of digital media as combining multiple temporalities (Barker, 2012). For example, when we access websites we consider them as

in Time for mapping
The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

-responsible individuals, sees a mutually constitutive relationship between state and market. The intellectual tradition of Ordo-liberalism that is credited with the building of a post-war ‘Soziale Marktwirtschaft’ (social market economy), provides a set of concepts and understandings that can be invoked to bring the market into the realm of political intervention and social dialogue.5 Writing from the time of the crises of the 1930s, the Ordo-liberals sought to critique laissez-faire liberalism, arguing that a social market economy required protective social institutions to be created

in Globalisation contested
Louise Amoore

be reached (Ashley, 2000). For a group of sociologists writing in the 1960s, the master concept of industrialisation captured the dynamics of transformation in a form that effectively enabled social change to be ordered and mastered. Industrial capitalism, with its inherent contradictions, was viewed as a temporary and transitory form of industrial society. The processes of industrialisation and technological advance defined all economic and social organisation, ultimately leading all societies passively to a convergent system of ‘pluralistic industrialism’ (Kerr

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

the market by limiting the entitlement of 13 weeks unpaid parental leave to parents of children born on or after 15 December 1999. While this dispute remains unresolved at the time of writing, it is illustrative of the contests that surround the making of a particular British hyperflexibility. The contested nature of the restructuring of working time is evident also in the public debate in Britain on ‘who benefits’ from temporal flexibility. Despite the rhetoric of empowerment espoused in Labour’s White Paper ‘Fairness at Work’ (Department of Trade and Industry

in Globalisation contested
Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard
Michiel de Lange

, being smart may in fact mean repurposing instead of reinventing the wheel. Innovation springs from these glitches in neat legibility. Mapping practices have evolved from making the city legible (Lynch, 1960), to writing the city with one’s own experiences on annotated maps (Greenfield and Shepard, 2007), to contribute to what Marc Tuters and I – taking the UNIX metaphor a step further – have called ‘executable urbanism’ (Tuters and de Lange, 2013: 49). Action maps and participatory mapping practices can make the city ‘hackable’ for its inhabitants, that is, open to

in Time for mapping