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Philip Nanton

two perspectives are clearly dissimilar in fundamental ways. Anderson’s colonialist perspective on immediate post-slavery St Vincent society takes for granted his own racial and cultural superiority to its inhabitants, and his own belonging to a regime of domination. His writing is therefore distinguished by distance, the engrained othering of the colonised ‘savage’ who represents the antithesis of

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Author: Philip Nanton

The book argues that the frontier, usually associated with the era of colonial conquest, has great, continuing and under explored relevance to the Caribbean region. Identifying the frontier as a moral, ideational and physical boundary between what is imagined as civilization and wilderness, the book seeks to extend frontier analysis by focusing on the Eastern Caribbean multi island state of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The continuing relevance of the concept of frontier, and allied notions of civilization and wilderness, are illuminated through an analysis of the ways in which SVG is perceived and experienced by both outsiders to the society and its insiders. Using literary sources, biographies and autobiography, the book shows how St. Vincent is imagined and made sense of as a modern frontier; a society in the balance between an imposed civilized order and an untameable wild that always encroaches, whether in the form of social dislocation, the urban presence of the ‘Wilderness people’ or illegal marijuana farming in the northern St. Vincent hills. The frontier as examined here has historically been and remains very much a global production. Simultaneously, it is argued that contemporary processes of globalization shape the development of tourism and finance sectors, as well as patterns of migration, they connect to shifting conceptions of the civilized and the wild, and have implications for the role of the state and politics in frontier societies.

Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

ruptures of functionalist and structural-functionalist anthropology with evolutionist (and diffusionist) principles on the grounds of their speculative procedures had wider consequences. They entailed a wider suspicion toward, the placing of a question mark on, history as such within the discipline. 1 Now the practice of anthropology could proceed in contradistinction to the writing of history. Second

in Subjects of modernity
Philip Nanton

island paradigm. The aim is not merely to critique from within, say, the world of Caribbean literary studies as it has traditionally been practised, as does a recent collection that – in critiquing the privileging of a specific group of postwar male writers, the ignoring of prewar writing, the marginalisation of writing by women, the prioritization of the ‘folk’ and the exclusion of the

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
In the beginning was song
Mads Qvortrup

forget, was writing against the backdrop of the ‘disenchantment of the world’. Even music, he believed, was in danger of being swept away by the torrents of scientism and wanton philosophy. Rameau,2 not only a composer but also a materialist musicologist, had developed an ingenious and elaborate science of music based on Newtonian physics. This was an almost blasphemous position according to Rousseau. In Lettre sur la musique française, he wrote, ‘If you limit the music to motions [and other physical phenomena], you completely rob it of its moral effects.’ Moral

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements
Saurabh Dube

modernity and history and their entanglements and contradictions, the subjects of this book. Untangling identity An apparent irony involving the past in our present turns on and draws together the terrains of history, modernity, and identity. Here is what the irony entails: exactly at the moment when formative procedures of disciplinary history writing have come under searing

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Time and space
Saurabh Dube

. Such readings could problematize the very nature of the historical archive as well as initiate conversations with other orientations, including those of structural linguistics and critical theory. 1 No less salient were incipient acknowledgments of the innately political character of history writing. In this wider scenario, attending the history (honors) undergraduate program

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Mads Qvortrup

learn from his writings. Moreover, in addition to explicitly stating that he was writing for all subsequent generations (see above), Rousseau arguably wrote about issues that were as salient then as they are now. The issue that ‘power corrupts’ may serve as an illustration. Rulers have always sought absolute power (or as few restraints as possible), hence the nature of the problem of constitutionalism has stayed unaltered, although the political circumstances have changed. It is, of course, true that we – as readers – belong to different traditions, and all reading is

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Open Access (free)
An introduction
Saurabh Dube

is only appropriate that I now introduce the key tendencies that both influence my wider work and carry key implications for this Theory for a Global Age series. 9 Here are to be found bodies of writing that have been deeply contentious and that I read critically in Subjects of Modernity . For these reasons, it is only after presenting their emphases and attending to the protocols of their

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Philip Nanton

Caribbean and in Britain. At the intellectual level, I have become preoccupied by a number of issues, explored here, that colonial and postcolonial studies have ignored or find difficulty in including in their grander analyses. A commonplace of postcolonial studies is the supposed subversiveness of the colonial/postcolonial subject, through the tropes of mimicry, cultural hybridity, and writing or speaking

in Frontiers of the Caribbean