Overriding politics and injustices
Vilho Amukwaya Shigwedha

In October 2011, twenty skulls of the Herero and Nama people were repatriated from Germany to Namibia. So far, fifty-five skulls and two human skeletons have been repatriated to Namibia and preparations for the return of more skulls from Germany were at an advanced stage at the time of writing this article. Nonetheless, the skulls and skeletons that were returned from Germany in the past have been disappointingly laden with complexities and politics, to such an extent that they have not yet been handed over to their respective communities for mourning and burials. In this context, this article seeks to investigate the practice of ‘anonymising’ the presence of human remains in society by exploring the art and politics of the Namibian state’s memory production and sanctioning in enforcing restrictions on the affected communities not to perform, as they wish, their cultural and ritual practices for the remains of their ancestors.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
David Deutsch

shifts in social context regarding viewpoints and current views. In addition, the scant traditional, pre-​Holocaust rulings concerning exhumations will be presented for juxtaposition with post-​war responsas. The second part of the chapter pursues the analytic outlook, highlighting the ‘forced’ innovativeness of rabbinic verdicts. Due to the lack of a valid literary lineage addressing these issues, there was a great deal of legislative flexibility –​hence, prompting a wide diversity in rulings. Rabbinical responsa writing during and after the Holocaust received scant

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Laura Chrisman

be argued that introduction 2 21/12/04 11:04 am Page 2 Introduction culturalist hegemony has diminished, and that thinkers such as Robert Young have arguably shifted to registers that are more materialist.7 It is not only Fanon that, among earlier generations of anti-colonial thinkers, now receives wide metropolitan critical respect and disciplinary inclusion. Individual thinkers such as C.L.R. James have begun to enjoy considerable postcolonial attention.8 And Elleke Boehmer’s Empire Writing. An Anthology of Colonial Literature 1870-1918 contains a range of

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

ego creep back into the following pages, perhaps as compensation for the fact that writing is a lonely business, but mainly because when addressing the contemporary state of social democracy, and trying to point out where you think it’s going wrong, some soapbox oratory is impossible to avoid. But hopefully the egoism does not get in the way of the book’s main purpose: to make connections. The world is a frightening place at the moment (though when was it not?) filled with people who seem to imagine that what it is really missing is another set of fundamentalist

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Anne McClintock and H. Rider Haggard
Laura Chrisman

with blackness, nor does it present white males as the categorical antithesis of degeneration. On the contrary: the writing of Haggard and a number of his late nineteenth-century contemporaries is where these presumptions are challenged.7 Degeneration is for these thinkers a fear of the debilitation of the imperial British race, occasioned by the development of modern industrial and financial capitalism itself. Modernisation, in other words, is held responsible, and in a number of ways: it enervates the proletariat, it destroys the labouring agrarian classes, it

in Postcolonial contraventions
Laura Chrisman

Ideological State Apparatuses rather than writing them off from the outset and then, in a self-fulfilling prophecy, criticizing them again when they seem to affirm one’s direst functionalist predictions. (p. 32) I am aware that the above might be sheer anathema for a new South African cultural studies, situated as it is in a new country already saturated by the languages of policy formation. But I take Bennett’s final sentence seriously as a call for proactive academic involvement with cultural policy that could effect a positive intervention in the emergence of a

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Becoming an “old maid”
Kinneret Lahad

process is a marker of her gradual withdrawal from the market, signifying her diminished sexual and reproductive value and functions. FACING THE HORROR : BECOMING AN “OLD MAID” 55 Debating the thirty-plus-year-old “old maid” In what follows, I seek to understand some of the discursive mechanisms by which the pejorative “old maid” label continues to be reproduced. The following analysis shows that the well-worn trope continues to prevail, in contemporary Israeli culture as well as in many societies where singlism reigns supreme. Orit Gal, a single woman writing on

in A table for one
Brad Millington and Brian Wilson

–Princeton university baseball game (Bryant and Holt, 2006 ; see Hitchcock, 1989 ). This same decade also brought the televising of events such as Wimbledon in the UK (Whannel, 1992 ). More than simply adding pictures to words, however, the introduction of television to the sporting landscape further cemented an already-existing relationship between sport, media, and capitalism. This is a point emphasized by Sut Jhally ( 1984 ) in his writing on the ‘sports/media complex’. For Jhally, the initial form of this complex

in The greening of golf
Critique and utopia in Benita Parry’s thought
Laura Chrisman

reading’, Parry used the ‘contrapuntal’ word in her book Conrad and Imperialism. She argues Conrad’s fiction to display ‘disjunctions between established morality and moral principle’ in which ‘ethical absolutes are revealed to be pragmatic utilities for ensuring social stability and inhibiting dissent’. These innovations … produce a contrapuntal discourse’ (p. 2; emphasis added). Edward Said’s version of contrapuntal model of writing and reading suggests, at times, the aesthetic harmonisation and displacement of social conflict, the promotion of liberal pluralism over

in Postcolonial contraventions
Laura Chrisman

he brought Parry’s Jewishness chapter8 21/12/04 140 11:21 am Page 140 Postcolonial theoretical politics into the discussion!) That he feels able unselfconsciously and arbitrarily to differentiate and play off his subjects in this way, is, I think, symptomatic of the unquestioned assumptions of authority and power which animate his discourse here. I question the intellectual validity and the political utility of deducing an individual’s politics from the mere fact of their birthplace. That Benita Parry’s writing does not do the business of the apartheid state

in Postcolonial contraventions