Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 50 items for :

  • Manchester Religious Studies x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Elizabeth Vandiver, Ralph Keen and Thomas D. Frazel

familiar to readers of modern English. I learned to love and admire Cochlaeus’s voice as I worked with his text, and my goal throughout has been to let as much of that voice sound through the English as I possibly could, in the hope that readers will be able to hear in my translation some echo of Cochlaeus’s learned and elegant style, of his complex but lucid sentences, and of the fervor which clearly motivated his writing.

in Luther’s lives
Open Access (free)
Elizabeth Vandiver, Ralph Keen and Thomas D. Frazel

’s struggle with his contemporary Catholic opponents. Vividly Cochlaeus captures the intensity and ardor on both sides of the Reformation dispute – a public battle for hearts and minds which had become possible only after the Gutenberg revolution. A prodigious reader, Cochlaeus punctuates his narrative with lively citations – many from documents little known or lost – which distill the ferocity and vitriol of the Reformation debate. Cochlaeus cites Thomas More writing in a most unsaintly tone about Luther, declaring the Reformer seeks only a most absurd kind of immortality

in Luther’s lives
Open Access (free)
An introduction to his life and work
Ralph Keen

. This survey offers the reader of the Commentary an introduction to the main events of Cochlaeus’s career and an assessment of his treatment of Luther. His career falls into three periods: from his youth to the beginning of his work as chaplain to the Duke of Saxony; the years in Meissen, when he was at his 42 Luther’s lives most powerful as an opponent of the Reformation; and his final years in Breslau, during which he completed a program of writing intended to accomplish with books what he was unable to do as an individual. The lasting monument of this period, and

in Luther’s lives
Open Access (free)
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

little reason to worry that historians might face the kind of ethical questions and conflicts of interest that cultural anthropologists,ethnologists,sociologists and a host of other students of contemporary people and cultures must confront, and in respect of which they must – very properly – perform ‘ethics reviews’, obtain waivers and clearances,allow their writing to be vetted by representatives of those studied, and remain

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Thomas D. Frazel and Ralph Keen

most keen, and especially suited for eloquence, he quickly surpassed his coevals and easily surpassed the rest of the youths in the school, both in acquiring vocabulary and fluency in diction, as well as in the writing of prose and verse. Therefore, having tasted the sweetness of literature, by nature burning with the desire for learning, he sought out the Academy, as the source of all learning. So great a power of intelligence would have been able to grasp all the arts in order, if he had found suitable Doctors, and perhaps both the gentler studies of Philosophy and

in Luther’s lives
S.J. Barnett

Dictionnaire quickly acquired recognition for its learned and often daring content. As Toland’s Christianity not Mysterious, the Dictionnaire became the touchstone for deists, sceptics and other religious radicals, yet, during the writing of the Dictionnaire, Bayle continued as a genuinely devoted member of the Reformed Church.20 As a Protestant who had suffered personal tragedy on account of religious intolerance, it is hardly surprising that he advocated toleration. Like Christianity not Mysterious, the Dictionnaire had, potentially, several audiences. In practice, however

in The Enlightenment and religion
A case study in the construction of a myth
S.J. Barnett

revelation as proof for religion and propagandized a rational or natural religion, the evidence for which lay in the qualities (especially reason and conscience) of an unchanging human nature and the frame of nature itself. This outlook also entailed a radical critique of the place of the Church within belief, and usually of the motivation and historical conduct of the priestly caste. Writing about ‘natural religion’ and evidence for God in the frame of nature (including human nature), however, was not the preserve of deists. To define those who wrote about natural

in The Enlightenment and religion
Open Access (free)
Agency and selfhood at stake
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

scholars preserving virtual silence on the ethical, as opposed to methodological or political, problems associated with writing about witches and witchcraft. It is important to state that we are not opposed to multiple readings of historical materials, nor to postmodern approaches. We are, however, opposed to readings – of any school – that treat human subjects as blank slates upon which a historian may inscribe whatever he or

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Open Access (free)
The historian and the male witch
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

. Erik Midelfort, writing about south-western Germany, devoted several pages to a discussion of why ‘witch panics almost always singled out adult women for special attention.’ He focused on demographic explanations, but remarked that ‘women seemed somehow to provoke an intense misogyny at times’ and that scapegoated groups attract to themselves the scapegoating mechanism. 13 Alan Macfarlane and Keith Thomas, historians of

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Alison Forrestal

, these men had initiated disciplinary reforms, presided over synods and fostered public preaching.22 Importantly too, the episcopate’s contemporary critics did not limit themselves to negative commentaries on its inadequacies. Rather, a long tradition of reflection and writing on episcopacy, an office considered to be as old as the church itself, existed within France by the beginning of the seventeenth century. For those who chose to look, some very positive notions of what it meant to be a bishop and of the precise nature of the episcopal office were available in

in Fathers, pastors and kings