Search results

Open Access (free)
A tradition of indirection
Author: Rachel E. Hile

This book examines the satirical poetry of Edmund Spenser and argues for his importance as a model and influence for younger poets writing satires in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The book focuses on reading satirical texts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in relation to one another, with specific attention to the role that Edmund Spenser plays in that literary subsystem. The book connects key Spenserian texts in The Shepheardes Calender and the Complaints volume with poems by a range of authors in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, including Joseph Hall, Thomas Nashe, Tailboys Dymoke, Thomas Middleton, and George Wither to advance the thesis that Spenser was seen by his contemporaries as highly relevant to satire in Elizabethan England. For scholars of satire, the book offers a fuller discussion and theorization of the type of satire that Spenser wrote, “indirect satire,” than has been provided elsewhere. A theory of indirect satire benefits not just Spenser studies, but satire studies as well. For scholars of English Renaissance satire in particular, who have tended to focus on the formal verse satires of the 1590s to the exclusion of attention to more indirect forms such as Spenser’s, this book is a corrective, an invitation to recognize the importance of a style of satire that has received little attention.

Open Access (free)
Personal Shakespeare
Steve Sohmer

himself to writing about, say, Napoleon isn’t so much writing about Napoleon as exploiting the Emperor to interrogate a question-issue-event that is dogging his writer’s mind. There are persons who write about Napoleon for Napoleon’s sake. They are historians. Simply put, Shakespeare’s plays are more personal than we have recognized. He has populated them with his

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Rachel E. Hile

Introduction We know that all texts are indeterminate, incomplete … but some are extra-indeterminate, written by design to be extra-incomplete, to require, more than other texts, that the reader transfer meaning from other texts and from other semiotic fields altogether in order to correctly interpret the meaning. This book focuses on one such type of text, what I call “indirect satire,” by which I mean satirical writing that the reader cannot understand as satire without this intersemiotic transfer of meaning into the textual interpretation. Sometimes, in the

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Rachel E. Hile

“indirect satire” in their passages about satire. Rather, we see this type of writing described in their passages on pastoral, as already quoted in Chapter 2 (in pastoral, Puttenham writes, poets use “rude speeches to insinuate and glance at greater matters”; Art, 128; and according to Sidney, poets “under the pretty tales of wolves and sheep” sometimes “include the whole considerations of wrongdoing and patience”; Defence, 127). Certainly all of the writers discussed in this book had a clear understanding of how literary works could subversively speak to sensitive

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

research that demonstrates the interactivity of reading and spectatorship in this period, from the violence of early modern writing and reading practices, to the iconoclasm so often associated with England in this period. 5 Drama participates in this culture of interactive reception; prologues, epilogues and chorus speeches are littered with calls for audience members to contribute to the production of onstage

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

to begin the process of thinking analytically about indirect satire, an understudied and undertheorized form of satirical writing. Numerous scholars have described Spenser’s satirical methodology in ways that emphasize his efforts to balance goals of criticism with a strong impulse toward self-preservation: Lauren Silberman comments on the slipperiness of potential topical identifications in Mother Hubberds Tale: “As the poet holds up mirrors more than one to himself and his objects … . Spenser makes it virtually impossible to isolate a discrete political attack on

in Spenserian satire
Chloe Porter

important for my study is what iconoclasm may tell us about early modern spectatorship. Fabio Rambelli and Eric Reinders, writing on iconoclasm in East Asia, view the destruction of images as a process with transformative implications for the iconoclast as much as for the destroyed object: The destruction of objects produces new meanings

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

. One assessment of the perfection and holiness of seven – exactly contemporaneous with Shakespeare’s writing of Julius Caesar – can be found in A New Treatise of the Right Reckoning of Yeares, and Ages of the World, and mens lives (1599) by Robert Pont (1524–1606). 19 In his preface Pont explains, ‘there is a marvelous sympathie of periodes of times, in

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Rachel E. Hile

and early 1600s, and so I leave aside an in-depth analysis of satire in The Faerie Queene to focus, as my subtitle indicates, on a tradition. My overall goal is to create a fuller and more nuanced view of Spenser’s influence on satirical poetry in England in the 1590s and the impact of Spenser’s role in the literary system on poets writing satire. Even though Spenser has never been thought of as primarily a satirist, his over- MUP_Hile_SpenserSatire_Printer.indd 64 14/10/2016 15:35 Spenser and the English literary system 65 whelming importance to poetry in

in Spenserian satire
Steve Sohmer

thereby (as it were to England, Fraunce, Italie, and Spaine) what fauour hee was in with her Maieste. 14 Clearly, Nashe did not have Harvey’s text before him. He was writing from memory and mis-remembered Harvey’s Latin. Harvey had written: ‘de Regiae Manus osculatione’ – which Nashe remembered as ‘ De Osculo

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind