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  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
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The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

leisure, freedom from fear and want, and the satisfaction of material needs at the expense of the minimum of effort.’ While drawing on the Arcadian literary tradition in her description of Buhaya, Huxley’s writing also made deliberate reference to contemporary claims about what could be achieved by the new technocratic, welfarist developmentalism of the post-war Empire. But Bukoba’s district

in Beyond the state
Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika
Michael Jennings

colonial period, often having established themselves as such before even colonial boundaries had been set and the violent occupation by the colonial state had begun. This was the case in Tanganyika. Writing of one area in southern Tanganyika, missionowned and run ‘clinics and hospitals provided’, Terence Ranger notes, ‘the sole effective medical facilities in Masasi district’. 3 The same could be said

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940
Yolana Pringle

agreed. But discussions over his secondment, and Ernest Cook’s eventual decision to remain in the Colonial Medical Service permanently, raised similar issues over understandings of the ‘missionary’ element of medical missionary practice in Uganda as it had done elsewhere. Writing to Ernest Cook in 1928, shortly before he decided to leave the CMS, Albert Cook noted that

in Beyond the state
Matthew M. Heaton

under age, his parent or guardian, should be asked to give a written consent to the proposed conditions before the voyage begins’. 40 Recognising the irony of this, Elder Dempster queried the Colonial Office, ‘to whom is it proposed a patient himself should give a written consent? If to an acceptable person or authority making arrangements for the voyage who in turn would instruct us in writing all well and good but we are

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

from home that littered the veld at every camp site. It was the first dramatic test of the new mass literacy, this orgy of letter writing by the working class.’ 3 Tabitha Jackson concurs; she claims that Forster’s Education Act of 1870 had provided a framework for compulsory elementary education, and that the literacy rate had grown from 63.3 per cent in 1841 to 92.2 per cent in 1900. The war, she

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Louis James

Caribbean literature, particularly admiring the Jamaican novelist Roger Mais. But in teaching he was a follower of F. R. Leavis, committed to the ‘great tradition’ of English writers. 6 I became a lecturer in English at Mona in September 1963. It was my second university post. I had been drawn to the new writing emerging from Africa and the Caribbean by a missionary childhood in what was then Northern

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

Vidiadhur Surajprasad Naipaul’s narratives of arrival in England return repeatedly to his father Seepersad’s nurturing of his artistic ambition in Trinidad, and his early prescience that the ‘idea of the writing vocation’ given him by a colonial acculturation could be realised and practised in England. 1 In making himself a writer, 2 he has abjured being categorised as

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
John Marriott

fabled past. 10 Andrew Hadfield’s more introspective study of the impact of travel writing in the early modern period reveals how such works reflected on problems within the English body politic at a time of change. 11 Because of the uncertain status shared by writers of prose fiction, dramatists and travellers, they chose consciously to disguise what were often

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

could she be called a West Indian? Rhys herself was uncertain at times, and some of her critics have hotly debated the question. There is no doubt of her love for the disturbing beauty of her native Dominica, a recurrent if occasional theme from her earliest stories onwards, evoked most powerfully in her final novel, Wide Sargasso Sea . Yet in all her writing about the island there is the sense

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

Letter-writing by the late Victorian soldiery was not merely more voluminous than previously recognised (though still an activity of a minority of the rank-and-file) but was a highly significant undertaking in its own right. Like the less extensive efforts in sketching, diary-keeping and poetry, this correspondence reflected a desire to record and interpret major

in The Victorian soldier in Africa