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Patrick Doyle

-operative perspective. In particular, his 1916 treatise, The National Being , provided an important intellectual touchstone for Sinn Féin intellectuals such as Darrell Figgis, Aodh de Blacam and Patrick Little. The first two individuals published a series of books and articles that argued in favour of Sinn Féin policies, while Little edited the Sinn Féin newspaper, New Ireland . All displayed this book's influence within their own writing. 18 The language of co-operation employed by these writers granted a social and economic coherence to the vision of a future independent Irish

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

without achievement, a future without hope’. If the plays of literary revivalists were intended to stage new forms of Irishness for audiences to consume, then Plunkett hoped that the co-operative society might serve as a stage on which a new rural subjectivity could be performed. Writing fifteen years after the establishment of the first co-operative creamery, Plunkett admitted that: The conclusion was long ago forced upon me that whatever may have been true of the past, the chief responsibility for the remoulding of our

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

the Department signified in writing for any other society to take any supply of milk from such person’. 110 This tied Irish milk suppliers to a co-operative creamery in a similar fashion to the Danish model and effectively overturned the House of Lords’ verdict on McEllistrim v Ballymacelligott to proscribe the locked-in relationship. The Act also prevented the establishment of co-operative societies in districts with little milk supply. The Creamery Act showed the willingness of the Irish Government to intervene in agricultural matters and shored up the

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

outside the mainstream of Irish politics. Importantly, a younger generation that grew to maturity influenced by the ethos and creative energy unleashed by the cultural revival began to announce itself in favour of the co-operative ideal. In particular, this crisis for the IAOS encouraged declarations of support from seemingly disparate political quarters, but gathered together in one source – The Irish Review . This monthly nationalist journal showcased writing on the topics of Irish literature, science and politics, and existed for three years between 1911 and 1914

in Civilising rural Ireland