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The autonomous life?
Nazima Kadir

violence. Hence, rather than solely framing anarchists’ participations in black blocs as representing a liberatory future, it would be helpful for the literature to consider how this participation is a demonstration of white privilege and as a result, reinforces hegemony rather than liberation. Research on the European social centers movement (Guzman-Concha 2008 ; Martínez 2007 ; Membretti 2007 ; Mudo 2004 ; 2005 ) similarly neglects internal movement dynamics. Similar to the writing on the women

in The autonomous life?
Lessons for critical security studies?
Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet

to say that learning, writing, and teaching about security requires coming to terms with an incredibly diverse and large amount of literature. It is also no exaggeration to say that security studies have undergone a remarkable boom since the mid-1990s. The boundaries of contemporary politics, discourses, practices, practitioners, producers, and end-users of security know nearly no limits. Security is

in Security/ Mobility
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Practice of Humanitarian Intervention (The Hague: Kluwer Law International, 1999), 42–3; Grewe, The Epochs of International Law , 493. 20 We hardly claim to have discovered all the publicists involved in the debate. Our main omissions are those writing in German, Italian or Spanish and in lesser known European languages, whose works were not translated into English or French

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
A bird’s eye view of intervention with emphasis on Britain, 1875–78
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

telegrams every hour: this is almost literally the case’ and a little later he added, ‘it rains telegrams morn, noon and night’. 103 She wrote that if the Russians reached Constantinople ‘the Queen would be so humiliated that she thinks that she will abdicate at once’. 104 In January 1878, when the Russians had won the war, she was beside herself with rage, writing to Disraeli that ‘[s]he feels she cannot … remain the sovereign of a country that is letting itself down to

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
A discourse view on the European Community and the abolition of border controls in the second half of the 1980s
Stef Wittendorp

–1) has identified this tension in the context of scholarly writing as well. Accounts emphasising the openness of borders, that is focusing on borders as facilitating flows, coexist with accounts pointing to the securitisation of borders, that is the making of borders as security devices. His suggested way out is the ‘networked border’, a term that captures the idea of border control as not necessarily

in Security/ Mobility
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America
Jeremy C.A. Smith

world societies and indigenous civilisations sum up the landscape of contemporary civilisational analysis at the time of writing. Where civilisational analysis has stretched its latitude to examine African, new world and indigenous civilisations, only limited progress has been made. This chapter begins to address these lacunae with modest moves to apply the model of inter-​civilisational engagement outlined in Chapters 4 and 5 to modern 152 152 Debating civilisations perspectives in culture and the arts, politics, theology and political economy produced in Latin

in Debating civilisations
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Surveillance and transgender bodies in a post-9/ 11 era of neoliberalism
Christine Quinan

climate of post-9/11 New York. Published in 2006, it is Feinberg’s second novel, coming twelve years after Stone Butch Blues appeared to critical acclaim. 1 The ease and beauty that marked the former novel, however, seems to have faded away in Feinberg’s latter foray into fiction writing. The prose is forced and clunky, with little emotion; it lacks nuance and its tone is

in Security/ Mobility
Hannah Arendt’s Jewish writings
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

Jews, focusing exclusively on ‘the weakness of the Jewish stance in the world’ and writing in a ‘heartless … and malicious tone’ on matters that touched ‘the very quick of our life’. Scholem accused Arendt of lacking love for the Jewish people, Ahabath Israel in Hebrew, which he described as typical of ‘so many intellectuals who came from the German left’. 65 In response, Arendt re-affirmed her cosmopolitan leanings in a clever and honest way by

in Antisemitism and the left
Nazima Kadir

independence according to the gradations of squatter capital, and self-consciously revealing her emotions more strategically. During a private conversation with Jenny, she advised me to hide certain information because, “it makes you look really bad.” Trying to add further insight into this case with the help of social movement studies proves challenging. In social movement studies, there is a dearth of information on micro-level social dynamics within social movement communities. The writing that exists about

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

much as religious identity is constructed, cultivated, and sustained by language. Language creates both common identities and separation and exclusion. Since the rise of modern nationalism, speaking and writing in the vernacular have been a part of the collective identity of a people or a nation, just as previously a more universal or less geographically rooted and restricted language had been part of the identity of elites: Latin for scholars and clergy throughout European Christendom; French for aristocrats and intellectuals in northern and eastern Europe, where

in Cultivating political and public identity