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Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America

of the experiences of the South echoed the tradition of Mariátegui’s Indo-​American socialism, the modernist arts, culture and literature and in sub-​continental versions of Marxism. Over a century, traditions such as these issued from historical conditions in which multiple civilisations were violently hurled together and compelled to intermingle. The formations, social imaginaries and civilisational backgrounds of Spanish, Portuguese, Amerindian and African civilisations collided with each other to produce new worlds including syncretic versions of Christianity

in Debating civilisations
Imaginaries, power, connected worlds

islands and Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Four theories of the peopling of the Americas are still debated, but the Bering Strait land bridge is still considered the most likely route (Paine, 2013: 22–​5). Further migrations around Ando-​America and Meso-​America stimulated processes of primary state formation and civilisational crystallisation. When states disintegrated (the Mayan being a prime example) further waves of migrants entered the major centres, often resulting in the foundation of new states. In sub-​Saharan Africa early expansion of Bantu-​speaking peoples into

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
An introduction

articulated processes of colony and post-colony; indigenous communities in the Americas under colonial and national rule; peoples of African descent not only on that continent but in different diasporas across the world; and, indeed, subaltern, marginal, and elite women and men in non-Western and Western theaters. For a wider discussion, see Dube, Stitches on Time

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)

of a strong sense of emotional national identity. For example, the United States has clearly been very successful in encouraging its citizens, many being recent migrants or the children of recent migrants, to develop a strong sense of being ‘American’ in both legal and emotional terms. At the same time they maintain their sense of ethnic national identity as ‘African-Americans’, ‘Polish-Americans’, ‘Jewish-Americans

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Antinomies and enticements

-Western “other.” Rather, at play in this terrain were the spatial severalty of Western selves and the temporal hierarchies of non-Western otherness. In this scenario, many peoples (for example, Africans, African-Americans, and indigenous groups in the Americas and across the world) were still stuck in the stage of barbarism and savagery with few prospects of advancement. Other societies (for example, those of

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Uses and critiques of ‘civilisation’

population is neither European nor North American, but are closer to a blend of Africa and America than they are to Europe, for even Spain herself is not strictly European due to its African blood, institutions and character. It is impossible to pinpoint exactly which human family we belong to. Most of the indigenous peoples have been annihilated, the European has mixed with the American and with the African, and the African has mixed with the Indian and the European. We are all children of the same mother but our fathers are strangers and differ in origin, blood, figure

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements

John Comaroff , “Images of empire, contests of conscience: models of colonial domination in South Africa,” American Ethnologist , 16 ( 1989 ): 661–85 . Comaroff and Comaroff, Ethnography and the Historical Imagination . 12 Dube, Stitches on Time ; Dube, After

in Subjects of modernity
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An epilogue

literatures of Asia, Africa, and Latin America,” construing new configurations of the mythic and the epic, space and time. 16 Finally, mid-twentieth-century cinema in the subcontinent straddled realist representations and innovative aesthetics that reached far beyond a mere “national allegory” and adroitly drew together the aural and the visual, sensibility and technique, dance and drama, the “old” and “new

in Subjects of modernity
The evolving European security architecture

behind such actions is what he calls ‘selfstyled’ actions as opposed to the previous logics of integration or interdependence.95 In certain areas, there seems to be a common European stance. De Schoutheete identified nine issue-areas where ‘quelques résultats’ could be identified in the EPC framework: the CSCE, East–West relations, Cyprus, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, the US, the Council of Europe and human rights. Januzzi identifies at least seven areas where there has been a common stance: Institutional imperatives of system change 187 Eastern Europe

in Theory and reform in the European Union

: 117). Noting that Eisenstadt draws into relief the religious premises of Euro-​American colonialism, Arnason points out that detailed scholarship challenges the results of his analysis (Blokker and Delanty, 2011:  127–​8). Too many complexities are highlighted in the historical and sociological literature on the Americas to leave Eisenstadt’s intended research strategy untouched. Marking out the respective positions of Eisenstadt and those who picture multiple American regions with multi-​civilisational influences (including the present author), Arnason argues that

in Debating civilisations