Search results

Open Access (free)
A tradition of indirection

This book examines the satirical poetry of Edmund Spenser and argues for his importance as a model and influence for younger poets writing satires in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The book focuses on reading satirical texts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in relation to one another, with specific attention to the role that Edmund Spenser plays in that literary subsystem. The book connects key Spenserian texts in The Shepheardes Calender and the Complaints volume with poems by a range of authors in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, including Joseph Hall, Thomas Nashe, Tailboys Dymoke, Thomas Middleton, and George Wither to advance the thesis that Spenser was seen by his contemporaries as highly relevant to satire in Elizabethan England. For scholars of satire, the book offers a fuller discussion and theorization of the type of satire that Spenser wrote, “indirect satire,” than has been provided elsewhere. A theory of indirect satire benefits not just Spenser studies, but satire studies as well. For scholars of English Renaissance satire in particular, who have tended to focus on the formal verse satires of the 1590s to the exclusion of attention to more indirect forms such as Spenser’s, this book is a corrective, an invitation to recognize the importance of a style of satire that has received little attention.

significantly as did others of his works. To put it mildly, it would have appeared presumptuous in the extreme for a young satirist of the 1590s to use The Faerie Queene as a pretext. Although I argue in this chapter that Joseph Hall does precisely that in Virgidemiarum Sixe Bookes, it was a bold move, which he presents as such and mitigates through obsequiously emphasizing the value of Spenser among poets. In my study, I have found Spenser’s earlier, shorter, more modest (in rota terms) poetry to be more productive of imitation and allusion among younger poets in the 1590s

in Spenserian satire

privileged young Englishmen and their mistresses and wives attended a play believed to be Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night in the hall of the Middle Temple, one of London’s four legal-social men’s foundations collectively known as the Inns of Court. 1 The occasion was Candlemas, officially the Feast of the Presentation of Our Lord in the

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

Torquato Tasso, Of Marriage and Wyvinge (London, 1599 ) and The xv ioyes of marriage (London, n.d. [ ca. 1598 ]); and Joseph Hall, Virgidemiarum, 2 vols (London, 1597–98 ). Scholars still debate why Caltha Poetarum (London, 1599 ) by ‘Thomas Cutwode’ (Tailboys Dymock, fl. 1584–1602) received a

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)

consider Spenser’s use of allegorical satire and allegory as satire in Daphnaïda, analyzing the ways that Spenser signals readers to interpret the poem satirically through playful use of allegory and metaphor. With Chapter 3, I move the discussion from Spenser to a wider circle of influence, starting with two somewhat reductive views from contemporaries of what Spenser “meant” in the literary system of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Two friends, Joseph Hall and William Bedell, wrote works that suggest an image of Spenser as an uncomplicated

in Spenserian satire

Advice to the Children. 150 Rachel Fane’s surviving notebooks contain recipes, sermon notes, translations and a fragment of a masque that was probably written when she was thirteen or fourteen. 151 O’Connor suggests that it is a ‘virtual certainty’ that the masque was ‘performed sometime between December 1626 and July 1627’ at the family home, Apethorpe Hall, Northamptonshire. 152 The children of the

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire

, Abuses, 17). Here, just as Joseph Hall had done in Virgidemiarum (as discussed in Chapter 3), Wither distinguishes the rough style appropriate for satire from the smooth decorum of Spenser’s non-satiric works; by doing so, however, he also alludes to Spenser more generally. Although this is the only reference to Spenser by name, allusions and patterns of animal imagery serve to “activate” Spenser in the mind of his readers. Even twenty-five years after the publication and calling-in of Mother Hubberds Tale, animal fables were still very much associated with Spenser

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?

. 7 See Lucy Gent, Picture and Poetry 1560–1620: Relations between Literature and the Visual Arts in the English Renaissance (Leamington Spa: James Hall, 1981 ), p. 6; Edward Chaney, The Evolution of the Grand Tour: Anglo-Italian Cultural Relations since the Renaissance (London: Frank Cass, 1998 ), p. xiii, and John Peacock, The

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Affiliation, allusion, allegory

the course of the poem something like idolatry of Daphne, as Oram notes; “Daphnaida,”147). Alcyon is sorrow, and sorrow is he, but he is supposed to be a man, or perhaps the pastoral equivalent, a “jollie Shepheard swaine.” More so than the critical portraits of character types found in the formal verse satires of Joseph Hall, Thomas Middleton, John Marston, and others, Spenser’s criticism of “the excessive mourner” seems to target a particular individual, Arthur Gorges. Yet the point he makes by reducing a putatively human character to a figure so “flat” that he

in Spenserian satire

4 Spenserian “entry codes” to  ­indirect  satire In his own satirical poetry, Edmund Spenser criticized indirectly, requiring readers to interpret clues carefully to access satirical meanings. For some readers, such as Joseph Hall and William Bedell, Spenser’s reputation as a decorous, conservative poet seemed to obscure awareness of him as also demonstrating an interest in or affinity for satirical writing, as discussed in Chapter 3. This chapter offers a corrective in the form of “case studies” of three poets who were quite sensitively attuned to the potential

in Spenserian satire