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Virtuousness, virtuality and virtuosity in NATO’s representation of the Kosovo campaign

campaign against the Kosovar Albanians. 33 Taken out of this context and accessed via the internet, these videoclips produce their own peculiar narrative of what ‘really’ happened during the Kosovo war. It comes as no surprise that the execution of military violence is cleansed of the mishaps and disasters that in the end cost the lives of about 500 civilians. Reminiscent of videogame simulations

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
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Kosovo and the outlines of Europe’s new order

Sergei Medvedev and Peter van Ham Preface: Kosovo and the outlines of Europe’s new order Introduction: ‘Brother, can you spare a paradigm?’ Twelve years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, talk about the end of the Cold War continues to haunt the professional discourse on European security. The seemingly innocent reference to the post-Cold War era has turned into an almost standard opening line of most writings

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
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A European fin de siècle

On a hot day in early June 1999, I was participating in a conference on European security in Berlin. The talk of the day was obviously the war in Kosovo. At the same time, at Unter den Linden, a few blocks away from the conference venue, a messy and joyful event was taking place – the Christopher Street Gay Parade, a prelude to the Berlin Love Parade held a couple of weeks

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Constructing security in historical perspective

the possibility of another war. He felt an overriding need to consider dealing with this danger [of a new war] through non-military means, such as implementing solutions to the refugee problem – a courageous concrete proposal to pay compensation, mending fences with the powers, and continuing efforts to reach an agreement with Egypt. In a nutshell this was

in Redefining security in the Middle East

global relations of domination. This chapter is first and foremost a contribution to discussions about the prospects and consequences of US hegemony. These discussions originated in the debate about the hegemonic stability theory that took place in the late 1970s and for much of the 1980s. 3 Following the end of the Cold War, the same assumptions, themes and tenets

in Mapping European security after Kosovo

T HE END OF bipolarity brought to light the difficulty inherent in using Cold War concepts of security to explain international relations in the developing world. As well, it has often been argued that international relations is basically an American (with some British input) enterprise ( Azar and Moon, 1988b : 1; Hoffman, 1977 ), with the consequences that

in Redefining security in the Middle East
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Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

networked global terrorism, from emergency management in the onslaught of tsunamis and hurricanes to oil wars in the Middle East’ (Hannam et al. 2006 : 1), a diverse range of concrete and abstract things have become highly global and mobile. While such movement is often considered part and parcel of modernity, it also brings about increased complexity that becomes enmeshed with conceptualisations of threat – ‘it is discourses

in Security/ Mobility
Israel and a Palestinian state

I N A WORLD that has recently undergone seismic change with the collapse of the Cold War and is still uncertain as to the ramifications of the New World Order, it is scholars who have become of key importance to developing theories or paradigms to comprehend changing relationships in the international arena. Novel concepts gain acceptance within the academic

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Public presence, discourse, and migrants as threat

is that it is by becoming an object of reporting, by entering the public sphere, that an issue actually becomes an issue, taking its specific form as something that really matters and its position in the hierarchy that defines how much something matters. The analysis here is concerned with the coverage of the mainstream daily press. Certainly, television and the Internet

in Security/ Mobility