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Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

light therapy and, most of all, on its limitations to register, disseminate, and legitimise the therapy as modern medicine. I ended Chapter 3 by mentioning how often light therapy’s photographs were retouched, or faked outright, to avoid the hazards and difficulties of capturing the therapy in process. Manual intervention, whether by retouching, assembling composites, or mixing illustration with photograph, is absolutely ubiquitous in its imagery

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

never once had this conception of my cancer, as a punishment for years of inhibition. But nor was I able to think of it as my enemy. Possibly if I had gone through chemotherapy I would have had to imagine the toxic doses as the good guys. Jackie Stacey records this moment: I am now required to embrace the treatment I have been struggling to avoid. Chemotherapy must be visualised as a positive intervention. Not poison, but pink champagne, they suggest in Bristol [the Bristol Cancer Help Clinic]. The more I can think of it as an ally, the less it will harm me. But I

in Austerity baby
Yulia Karpova

of a lack of information about modern alternatives, not because of any conscious choice to follow family traditions. In fact, Nevler noted that a dormitory (in Russian obshchezhitiie, literally ‘a place for communal living’) is not a typical domestic environment, but rather a site of collectivism in much need of ‘massive artistic intervention’. The militarist rhetoric of Nevler’s argument here contrasts strikingly with his earlier nuanced explanation of people’s tastes, revealing the professional anxiety over social mobility and the growing youth culture at that

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

claims that light, and especially ultraviolet light, could be used to great therapeutic effect. Finsen was known throughout the world for his work with phototherapy, and Britain was no exception. He became internationally renowned for the treatment’s success and in 1903 won the Nobel Prize in Medicine. Through the intervention of Queen Alexandra (then Princess of Wales), Finsen’s methods and equipment were imported to the (Royal

in Soaking up the rays
Yulia Karpova

2 Technical aesthetics against the disorder of things In March 1964 Dekorativnoe Iskusstvo SSSR published an overview of modern modular furniture. It opened with a description of modern objects’ rapid intervention in the home: The TV set required rearrangement. Turning its back to the light, it oriented the recreation zone around itself. This attracted soft chairs, a collapsible sofa, a coffee table and decorative objects, whereas a dining table, which used to occupy an honourable central place in the room, had to move closer to the wall. Doing so, it did not

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

similar vein, what is light therapy but a deliberate invention and intervention with skin as an excessive, therapeutic form of ‘light writing’? The skin was so effective acting as a photograph (photogram) that for practitioners like Eidinow it superseded photographic devices for measuring light intensities, such as photometers and spectroscopes. Developing from, merging with, and eventually superseding photography, light therapy

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

radioactivity ( Chapter 4 ). Finsen’s publications were translated into German, French, and English, enabling global dissemination. And the world took notice. By 1900, Britain imported phototherapy into its best hospitals, primarily through the intervention of fellow Dane, Queen Alexandra (1844–1925), then Princess of Wales. 93 Having visited the Finsen Institute in 1899, the princess was so impressed that she purchased a Finsen lamp

in Soaking up the rays
Yulia Karpova

-and-vital basis’ that had been no less than the ‘artistic intervention into human habitat’. Exhibited in glass cases, the contemporary objects were alienated, non-belonging and devoid of a consumer, Osmolovskii complained.15 This alienation, however, was explained not as an agency of objects beyond consumer culture – a thing-power, as Jane Bennett would describe it – but by the overgrown artistic ego. The artists now addressed their objects not to consumers but to exhibitions, that is, to themselves for the purposes of self-promotion: ‘Today, looking at a cup, KARPOVA

in Comradely objects