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Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia

-temporal structure for culture at large, and she argues that in Kittler’s media theory, technology provides a means for channelling temporal irreversibility (Krämer, 2006). Because the cinematic image has been perceived by media theorists as radically different in its representation of time, this chapter starts by highlighting the similarities and differences between the temporal structures of the moving image and geographic media. It continues by showing how the integration of time changed with the introduction of navigational means in geomedia, and then outlines the influence of

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

6 Traces, tiles and fleeting moments: art and the temporalities of geomedia Gavin MacDonald Introduction: geomediation in the inhabitable map In this chapter, I discuss ways in which artists have exploited and exposed the temporalities of ‘geomedia’. I am following writers working at the intersection of media studies and geography in using this term to refer to a contemporary complex of technologies, content and practices that involve mapping, remote survey visualisations and the binding of digital information to location via GPS (Thielmann, 2010; Lapenta, 2011

in Time for mapping
The case for practice theory

turn to algorithms opening up the black-box of map technologies to critique. Third, cultures of map use, drawing on visual and comparative media studies (including software/ computer game studies) to engage with contextually localised uses. Fourth, authorship to explore altered power relations inherent within map produc- 158 Stitching memories tion (including new prosumer affordances); and fifth, research on infrastructure focuses on the materialities of digital maps, both to ‘consider the infrastructure that makes that make mapping possible’ and to ‘analyse the

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

. Hoy, D. C. (2012) The Time of Our Lives: A Critical History of Temporality. Boston, Massachusetts: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press. Jenkins, H. (2006) Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press. Joliveau, T. (2009) Connecting real and imaginary places through geospatial technologies: Examples from set-jetting and art-oriented tourism. The Cartographic Journal, 46(1): pp. 36–45. Kitchin, R., Lauriault, T. P. and McArdle, G. (2015) Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking

in Time for mapping
Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

, 13(3): pp. 227–243. Callon, M. and Law, J. (2003) On qualculation, agency and otherness. [Online] Available at: www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/resources/sociology-online-papers/papers/callon-lawqualculation-agency-otherness.pdf (accessed 1 August 2016). Ciuccarelli, P., Lupi, G. and Simeone, L. (2014) Visualising the Data City: Social Media as a Source of Knowledge for Urban Planning and Management. Dordrecht: Springer. Crandall, J. (2010) The geospatialisation of calculative operations: Tracking, sensing and megacities. Theory, Culture and Society, 27(6): pp. 68

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences

methodology and historical review. The Canadian Cartographer, 16: pp. 17–33. Martin, E. (1996) The society of flows and the flows of culture: Reading Castells in the light of cultural accounts of the body, health and complex systems. Critique of Anthropology, 16: pp. 49–56. Marx, K. (1973) Grundrisse. Translated by M. Nicolaus. London: Penguin. McLuhan, M. (1964) Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. New York McGraw Hill. Merriman, P. (2012) Mobility, Space, and Culture. London: Routledge. Monmonier, M. (1993) Mapping It Out: Expository Cartography for the Humanities

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future

weather or disease maps), or else sought to build and expand upon it (e.g. various social media-based reaction maps). A tension thus exists between the formalisation of time, and its informal destabilisation. Michiel de Lange’s chapter complicates this unstable notion of temporality. Discussing the problematics of the smart city dashboard’s ‘real-time’, he builds on sociologist Barbara Adam’s (2008) work to further disassemble the idea of temporal instability. He argues for an asynchronous approach to the city that ‘highlights latency, recurrence, deferred understanding

in Time for mapping
A trialogue

reasons, it’s less about leaning about your e­ nvironment – Interesting. So smell becomes That’s very i­ nteresting sexualised. And then because presumably smell it’s more about actually smell- is marginalised in formal ing for other people, rather educative practice in than smelling for environmen- schools? There are very tal learning. few formal curricular links in terms of the smellscapes; Yes, but I am sure that cerso I guess we simply pick tain cultures have strong inforthings up through culmal ­smelling  traditions which are tural practice rather than passed  on

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)

the globalisation process, removing the messiness of politics and leaving only the ‘right and necessary’ policy measures. As the millennium turned, the picture began to change so that we now begin to see partial glimpses of the push and shove of a social and political contestation that was, in truth, always present. Now we see the news media popularising debates about the power of multinational corporations (MNCs), the plight of the global economy’s ‘new slaves’ and the ‘anti-globalisation’ protests (Klein, 2000; Bales, 1999; British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC

in Globalisation contested

and object, nature and culture, between body and map and indeed between time and space; the geometric logic propagating taxation, territory, terror, war and frontier (Lacoste, 1973). Yet on the other hand, as Newling’s bewilderment attests to, maps and mappings continue to disorientate and perplex. The chronologically ritualistic choreographies between bodies and cartographies, between satellite navigation devices and world-weary drivers, for example, manifestly complicates any straightforward division between maps and their users, or between representation and the

in Time for mapping