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Looking beyond the state

Medicine in Uganda , Nairobi, East Africa Literature Bureau, 1970; Michael Gelfand, A Service to the Sick: A History of the Health Services for Africans in Southern Rhodesia, 1890–1953 , Gweru, Mambo Press, 1976; Judith N. Lasker, ‘The Role of Health Services in Colonial Rule: the Case of the Ivory Coast’, Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry , 1, 1977 , pp

in Beyond the state

demonstrated how imperial culture was made by complex modes of reception and appropriation, how ideas about empire, citizenship, and identity were forged in encounters and experiences ‘on the ground’, as it were, and how colonial knowledge was always imperfect and partial. The Delhi durbar was the greatest act in the performance of imperial culture by British royals. The royal jeweller crafted a lighter

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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transport and communication, the steamship and the telegraph. Royal movements were disseminated by an expanding culture of print in Britain and the empire and through the new medium of photography. By the mid-nineteenth century, royals could travel in comfort and safety by land and sea because of British naval dominance, the expansion of settler communities, and the ‘neutralisation’ of indigenous peoples

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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) where there were no original indigenes, 2 they changed irrevocably the social vocabulary of the metropole. The role of culture as a means of subverting the dominant order is, arguably, at its most refined in the Caribbean. 3 The long centuries of slavery provided a fitting apprenticeship where the ground rules of alternative, creolised, cultural forms and social practices were laid

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

.1 Itinerary of the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour of Canada Each of the parties involved in organizing the tour, from the IODE and the SOSBW to the Canadian and British Governments, had its own particular great hope for the tour. Such enthusiasm on an imperial and a national scale contrasted with the media attention. A wide selection of

in Female imperialism and national identity

Indian culture. Earlier manifestations were to be found in accounts of tribals, but striking was the tendency increasingly to locate these pathologies in areas of indigenous settlement at the heart of colonial power. Here the so-called Black Town areas of Calcutta and Madras featured prominently. Descriptions of these areas were part of a nascent urban mythology that requires brief attention. References

in The other empire
Defending Cold War Canada

Communism’. 97 With its history of encouraging British-influenced Canadian arts and culture, the IODE was active in submitting a brief to the 1951 Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts. Meanwhile, at the local chapter level school prizes in arts and music continued across the country. Attempts to influence the media were made by the IODE throughout the 1950s. In 1955 the Edmonton Journal

in Female imperialism and national identity
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Visions of history, visions of Britain

published in 1992 after James’s death, was a pioneering work in many ways; not least in its analysis of ‘popular culture’ – cinema, comic books, radio serials, mass-market fiction – as a key to understanding British society. These were also seminal, turbulent years in James’s personal life. In 1939 in Manchester, he met and fell in love with the eighteen-year old Constance Duckfoot

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples

exception. But this was personal salvation by which individual lives were transformed by Christ’s saving grace. Integral to the spiritual challenge was the conviction that people of different races and cultures should genuinely love and accept one another without distinction. Moody did not think that collective social attitudes could be changed or engineered in the short term. His social and political

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain