Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

, recalibrate their behaviour. This recalibration is measured, ‘and the feedback loop can run once more, every action stimulating new behaviours that inch us closer to our goals’ ( Geotz, 2011 ). Resilience, with its emphasis on constant adaptation, sits well with ideas of feedback and design. Social reproduction can be optimised by changing behaviour relating to household savings, energy consumption, educational priorities, mental and physical productivity and maternal and child health ( World Bank, 2015 : 2). Taken together, these factors are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

and Operations Priorities made by UNRWA’ Year Operational change implemented Further information on the change 1982 Change: food and relief no longer provided to all registered refugees Beneficiaries: relief only provided to ‘special hardship cases identified by social workers’ Selection criteria: no men aged 19–60 female-headed households over-60s 1994 Change: stopped mental health programmes Reason given: mental health programmes no longer considered beneficial since they are ‘clinical rather than

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

their capacity to communicate effectively with conflict-affected groups on the nuances of key concepts (for instance around protection or mental health), and important technical distinctions (e.g. between categories of explosive remnants of war, each requiring specific safe behaviors from civilians). ( TWB, 2017a ) Overcoming language barriers is more difficult for people who speak so-called ‘low-resource languages’ (e.g. Quechua). 6 Trained translators

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

ICRC is really the first human rights organisation ( Hopgood, 2013 : chap. 2). We can point to different emphases – the law versus medicine, justice and accountability versus crisis and need – but common to both these strategies for normative action is a commitment to the physical and mental integrity, the existential moral dignity, of all human beings whoever they are and whatever they have done. This is distinctively modern, and liberal, and still something of a heresy in many Western societies let alone beyond. It is only if one shares this

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
The narrative
Sara De Vido

the following rights as being infringed by VAW: the right to life; the right not to be subject to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to equal protection according to humanitarian norms in time of international or internal armed conflict; the right to liberty and security of person; the right to equal protection under the law; the right to equality in the family; the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health; the right to just and favourable conditions of work.27 Other rights can be considered

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

equipped to welcome her and her dis­abled child. Even after she did manage to leave the apartment where they lived, her husband continued to stalk and beat her, as ten medical certificates demonstrated. She claimed that her physical integrity, physical and mental health, and life were at 27 DE VIDO 9781526124975 PRINT.indd 27 24/03/2020 11:01 Violence against women’s health in international law serious risk and that she lived in constant fear. Criminal and civil proceedings started against the husband, without success. A.T. complained that the state had failed to

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

turned to restrictions on abortion, and argued that ‘legally coercing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term is not only an abuse of her basic human rights, but may also be extremely damaging from a mental health perspective.’15 The use of the adverb ‘legally’ is interesting for my purposes, because it identifies the perpetrator as the state, through its laws and policies. Restrictions on abortion might also have physical effects, especially when a woman decides to undergo ‘unsafe abortions,’ an expression which includes procedures carried out below the minimum

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

9781526124975 PRINT.indd 188 24/03/2020 11:01 The treatment and reproductive health.’77 Even though it can easily be said that this obligation resembles the obligation of due diligence, this is only partly correct, since the duty to protect also requires ‘States to put in place and implement laws and policies prohibiting conduct by third parties that causes harm to physical and mental integrity,’ which seems to me to define a specific result, rather than an obligation to make best efforts. Finally, there is the obligation to fulfil human rights, requiring states to ‘adopt

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Richard Parrish

ensuring citizens gain access to sporting events and information on them. The emphasis on social interaction is supplemented with a focus on sport as a method of countering the deleterious effects of smoking, alcohol and drug abuse and a preventative weapon against potential health problems such as cancer and cardiovascular problems. Sport therefore has a role to play in the field of physical and mental health and social interaction. The report also emphasised the economic significance of the sports sector in Europe. According to the report sport generates an estimated 1

in Sports law and policy in the European Union